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I'm pretty sure that you can not legally be named POA because of your position as a paid healthcare provider, that is the way it is where I live anyway.
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I am no lawyer, but recently in Hawaii, caregivers were given a senior's home, and she claimed not to know what she was signing, after the fact. In my humble opinion, openly seeking council with your client would be the cleanest way to go about it. If she has children or even brothers and sisters all the more reason to align the heart with practical matters to ensure the integrity of your intentions is unimpeachable.
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P.S. What a lovely compliment she is paying you!
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It is up to your client whom she chooses to give POA.

But you are right to consider the ethical position. If you work for an agency, they may have rules and you may have to resign your job. If your client is going to continue to employ you as her primary caregiver, again there will be conflict of interest questions and financial gain questions to address. They shouldn't be insoluble questions, but you would do well to get professional advice before proceeding.

If you cease to be this lady's caregiver at all... I can't see why there should be an issue, then. But ask a professional.
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