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Four months ago I had a total reverse shoulder replacement (will do the next shoulder in 4 months) and find it too painful to sleep on either side. Most likely the pressure ulcer is still a stage 1 but I need to address it now so that it won't worsen. If it should worsen then I have to postpone the next surgery! My husband is the only one to help me but he has Alzheimer's and going downhill fast. With the 1st bed sore I saw a wound care specialist (no longer there of course) and she used honey patches on the sore that had reached a stage 3. Within a week it was gone! Any suggestions as to how best I can keep the pressure off this area and still sleep? Thanks in advance! :)

make sure you reposition every 2 hours keep some pillows or something soft under the sore area.god bless.
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Reply to Thomasm11
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Get a new wound care specialist immediately. Do not wait until the pressure sore worsens and you'll have an even more difficult time getting rid of it. Also, speak with your pharmacy team and see what their suggestions are. They have a wealth of knowledge.
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Reply to Llamalover47
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My sister, an RN in cardiac step down unit, and I, former Med/Surg and Critical Care RN, talked about your issue. We both agree you need to get off the affected area or it will never heal. She suggested getting an inflatable doughnut to keep the area "floated" off the bed. I was wondering if you might find foam wedges to keep you partially on your side and slightly lying back (pressure would alternate from one side of hip to other) more comfortable than lying on your shoulder.
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Reply to Taarna
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I have also had reverse shoulder replacements, although many years apart, so I think I understand your pain. If all goes well, eventually you should be able to sleep on each operated shoulder without significant pain. Once you can go back to side sleeping, you'll relieve the pressure that is causing the pressure sore to develop. Four months is not terribly long to have pain after a reverse shoulder replacement; it should gradually improve. I was fortunate that my surgeries were so far apart that I was able to sleep on the better side each time and did not have to sleep on my back. You may want to voluntarily postpone the second surgery until you can sleep comfortably on the side that was operated on four months ago. Do your surgeon and P.T. know that the pain is severe enough that you can't sleep on the operated side? I think if the doctor prescribes additional P.T.--or even O.T.--you might be able to have more therapy specifically targeted at that problem. An O.T. might also be able to prescribe some maneuvers that would allow you to sleep on your side(s) with less discomfort. Just some adjustments with pillows might be able to help. And if the main problem is getting to sleep with the pain, but the pain does not wake you up during the night, you might be able to put a heat-in-the-microwave pack under the panful shoulder as you go to bed, lie on your side, and get enough pain relief and relaxation so that you can go to sleep. (I'm suggesting this instead of a heating pad both because of the additinal bulk/cushioning the pack will supply, and also the knowledge that it is safe to go to sleep, knowing that the pack will cool down without your intervention.)

I am not knowlegeable about the treatments for pressure sores that have already begun; the other answers speak to that question. However, since you've been a side sleeper, it seems to me the best goal is to get you back on your side and ro thus eliminate the cause of the sore.
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Reply to caroli1
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Pressure sores are just that - the place where pressure is exerted when you are sitting or laying. You have to relieve the pressure. Think in terms of the donut cushion that many people use. You might try to relieve pressure in bed by purchasing one of those eggcrate type mattress pads. Cut a hole where the sore is. Start with the smallest possible hole. Then when you are laying down, there is some space between the healthy area and the sore is not touching the real mattress below the wound. Also, talk to the doctor about the honey patches you previously used since they worked well for you.

You can also use the foam rubber mattress topper for your chair. Cut it as wide as chair - and leave it long enough to go from head to foot. Cut the hole where sore is. You might even want to double the foam rubber pad to give extra padding between you and the chair.
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Reply to my2cents
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This is about position, not the sore. Because of back pain, I sleep in many different positions. Most of us have a ‘favourite’, but if you have experience of long-haul air flights you know that you can actually sleep in other positions. I have slept sitting up many times, in a chair with a footstool or in a recliner. I have slept flat on the floor carpet, and often on the floor with my legs at right angles and lower legs propped up on an ottoman. Also in bed with 3 pillows under my knees, so that my back is flat on the bed. At the moment I’m usually sleeping in bed without a pillow. It’s worth experimenting with positions that change your body pressure, probably with a sheepskin to help.

My BIL died at home, bed-bound after he fell and broke a leg, and they hired a hospital bed with an inflate-deflate mattress which worked very well as a preventative.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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When mine got them during surgical recovery (not knowing it was already MRSA and he was going septic) his primary care said she would order Ambulatory Care to the house. Please call to see if this is an option. Pressure ulcers/staph/bed sores are deadly! Please make appropriate actions immediately as this becomes lethal if not addressed properly!!!
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Reply to PowerOf3
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The medication we use is called EndIt, which is available over the counter at the drug store. It is a zinc oxide preparation applied twice daily. The hospital treatment is with a mattress overlay that has ridges that can be inflated with a small air pump. The overlay produces a wave effect under the bottom sheet that causes the body to adjust it's position slightly so that the back moves slightly during sleep, so that pressure points are moving and not constant over one location. I don't know what the actual name of it is, but you would need to contact a hospital supply house to get one, I expect. We have one that was supplied by Hospice for our client (my wife). And it seems to work without disturbing her sleep; I don't think she notices it. Several years ago she was in a rehab facility and her bed had one of these devices, and she hated it. I think more able to notice it than she is now. Those are the remedies I know of. If the sore is open then I suggest that you get help from a nurse or doctor, or maybe contact Mayo Clinic on line for advice. I don't know about honey patches but you seem to have had success with them. I hope all this helps!
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Reply to PungoMac
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Medical grade sterile honey, or the use of Mepilex patches to cover the area where the pressure sores develop.
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Reply to gmacon219
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Talk to your doctor TODAY.
A referral to a wound care nurse or specialist will help.
Also ask about getting an alternating pressure mattress. This could be one as simple as it having air that moves through or as elaborate as one that will actually inflate and deflate.
You could also talk to the PT that is working with you for the shoulder. (I hope you are seeing a PT)
The risk is if you have a Pressure sore you may not be a good candidate for the surgery that you have planned in the next 4 months so this has to be addressed ASAP. And you will probably need the air mattress for several months after.
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Reply to Grandma1954
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My Sister ordered a sheepskin to put under her butt to sleep with a gel pad under it.

She used a cream called Butt Cream on any kind of redness before the sore came
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Reply to bevthegreat
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JuliaRose Nov 9, 2019
Yes, we also use sheep skin. It’s actually fake sheep skin. It seems to really help because it allows circulation.
(1)
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Have you asked your doctor for a referral to a wound care specialist? I would definitely do that.

My understanding is that you should be using an air mattress that has articulating chambers, this adjusts your position and stops pressure points.

I would also be active during the day and not sitting a lot if that is what I need to do to sleep.

Best of luck.
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Reply to Isthisrealyreal
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