If you have PSP, will Hospice get involved?

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I recently have been looking into hospice for my father. You can call a hospice service and ask them to do an evaluation. This evaluation should be free. Be aware though that they are not completely objective as they get big fees for providing service. Where I live, the different hospice services tend to be aligned with a doctor and/or care facilities so do your homework when picking the one you prefer. Also, note that some are "For profit" businesses and others are "Not-for-profit". We prefer a "not-for-profit" with the hope that decisions will be made that are best for Dad as opposed to best for their shareholders.
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Update-They were at her daughters house for 24 hours. Her daughter explained to them the danger of what they were doing, that she has a full time job at a psych unit, she can't take off work and that they needed to come back to my house to receive proper medical attention. Sue's husband was delusional or something. He thought sue's daughter had a week off and could take care of her while he was in the hospital. He got mad, took sue back into the RV and left. They have decided to continue their journey until the paramedics come to get them.
My husband has decided to let them have their fun. Since she is his mother, he does have the final say. Thankyou for your good advice, I am calling around for medicaid nursing homes and finding out what other publically funded programs are available when they touch down (or crash) to earth
-cheerful-
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Hospice will get involved if the patient has enough things wrong with them to cause death within six months. Respiratory-related deaths were significantly more frequent in PSP when compared to PD patients. Recurrent respiratory infections were also very frequent in PSP patients and were commonly associated with respiratory-related deaths. Deaths that occurred during winter and spring months accounted for about 70% of deaths among PSP patients. The most common co-morbid condition in PSP was hypertension, present in 50% of cases.
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Cheerful, what's going on with your mother? Please update.
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Hit "post comment" too soon. Sorry.

If you're talking about progressive supranuclear palsy and that is the only medical condition I don't think someone would be eligible for hospice. While this is progressive it's not fatal. Hospice comes in when a person has about 6 months left to live.
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I'm assuming you're talking about progressive supranuclear palsy?
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