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My husband had a stroke almost a month ago, so he can no longer mow our lawn. I have health issues too and am allergic to grass. Our grandson has been doing it for us the last couple of years, but he is moving out of Lincoln, so we are trying to find someone that will either do it for free or charge very little. We only have my Social Security income coming in right now, and it's only $220 a month.

JHalidenton raises an important issue of liability.   I haven't checked case law in years, but the concept used to be that (a) if an individual is injured on property after being invited onto the property, the homeowner could/would be liable to the "invitee" (irresponsible behavior could factor in), but (b)  if the individual was on the property w/o permission, that individual would be responsible for any injury.

I think (a) would apply in your situation, so liability is a serious thing to consider, even if you have coverage under your homeowner's property. And lawn mowers can be dangerous.

Your situation unfortunately is an example of the desperate need for more support for older people who are otherwise capable of remaining in their own homes.  

You might try local agencies such as Area Agency on Aging and something like the Oakland Livingston Human Services Agency (in my state) (https://www.olhsa.org/complete-services for examples of what they offer), as it's my understanding that they do offer support for various homeowner's services.

Further on Jhalldenton's comments, I've seen a troubling trend on a related issue:  that of requiring hold harmless, indemnification and defend agreements for a wide variety of applications, some of which are ridiculous.

Shrink wrap computer T & C have been in use for years, and to me they're offensive.   But they're also required by big companies with ample assets.   Now I'm seeing them on less prominent websites, and there's no applicability whatsoever.    The outfit NextDoor had one in its T&C.   I threw away the promotional literature; I won't indemnify some guy who's just hosting sites for neighbors to get together.

While I understand the potential of blowback, I really think the indemnification trend has gone too far.   And the withdrawal of some agencies as mentioned here contributes to that opinion, but then that eliminates a source of help for those in need.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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When your resources are so limited it is very difficult to pay for yard work. Do you eat or do you pay someone to cut the grass. Asking "Why would you expect someone to do it?" I would offer up this - we all should be available to share our abundance with those who have needs.

As a single parent, I had no milk or bread and I was sick and in need of a doctor and medicine. Unexpectantly a friend of mine shook my hand at church and when she did she passed a little match box to me. "Look in it when you get home." I was surprised to see a $50 bill in the box. It was exactly enough to pay the doctor, get the medicine and buy a few groceries.

Pass kindness on. Years later I was able to pass on to others the kindness and generosity that was shown to me. Now that was aprox in 1972 so a $50 gift was enormous.

I understand the liability that comes when you have others on your property. When we did this for others - we assumed our own safety but we certainly walked the property and used our own equipment. Giving to others is such a blessing.
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pamzimmrrt Apr 7, 2021
My husband mows our neighbors lawn, has for years, and also removes the snow from her drive.. she is in her 70s. He knows her lawn as well as our own, and he is glad to help her out. I don;t think it would dawn on us to sue if something happened.. to us is just being a good neighbor and a good person. Maybe that makes us stupid but it;s our way to give back some of the good we have.
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I guess why do you think someone should do it for free?
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lealonnie1 Apr 7, 2021
For the same reason my neighbor across the street removes the snow from the 3 widows' driveways every time it snows here, before the snow removal people arrive here, even though it's already paid for in our HOA monthly dues. Because he's doing a nice thing for his neighbors. Those types of 'mitzvahs' still DO exist, you know, even in 2021.
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Before you ask anyone outside your family to mow a yard for free you will need to consider the following. Is the yard totally without any hazards that could harm the person doing the mowing? Any hazards, holes, wasps nests, limbs, snakes or anything that could harm someone during the mowing could be used to sue should you neglect to tell the person doing the mowing. This was brought up about the boyscouts. Should someone get injured on your property and you didn't tell them about know (and possibly unknown) hazards you could be taken to court should the injury be severe enough. A free lawn mowing could cost you more than you expect. Call a professional mowing company and see if they could give you a discount. Be sure to tell them that you have not been in the lawn in a while (if you haven't) and express to them that you don't know if the lawn is safe.
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There is a ministry - a great need for one - to help seniors. We are in the same boat except I can afford to pay $200 a month but we have 5 acres and no one will touch it. I don't know how much more I can downsize but all of our volunteers have not been available this upcoming mowing season. For those of you who feel you don't have anything to do - this would be great. We have helped those who need it all our lives, but our counterparts are gone or are too ill to help. You've got some good ideas and hopefully you will find someone soon.
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Reply to LNReason
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I can’t understand why only $220.00 a month in SS. Apply for SSI to supplement. Many organizations have discontinued mowing because of liability issues. My church no longer does volunteer chores because of complaints from recipients. Last year a friend and I spent 4 hours weeding a lady’s yard. She threw a fit at us because we dropped 2 dandelions on her driveway.
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Reply to Bridger46164
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$220 is that what you have left after paying bills? I get more than that, $800, and I worked on and off, fulltime jobs and part-time jobs.

I was told Boy Scouts, at least in my area, do not mow grass anymore. Its a liability thing.
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If there's a branch of the Mormon Church (LDS) in your area, contact them.   Their members are tasked with performing good works for people in need.

It seems that with only $220 income, you would be in need of other services as well.    The Alzheimers Assn. was very cooperative when I asked for lists of different kinds of assistance, and Senior Centers sometimes have lists as well.   Your local county may also be of assistance; ours provides a variety of outreach services.  

Are you getting Meals on Wheels?
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Reply to GardenArtist
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Some churches have ministries that help elders with their yards. Might want to call around.

Other than charitable or non-profit organizations, it’s not likely you’ll be able to have a consistent lawn mower who will do it for free.
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Reply to LoopyLoo
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Have you asked your next door neighbors? Or, you can put out an appeal on Nextdoor.com, or call your local Boy Scouts troop? Today it's the lawn but in the long-run, what is your plan as you both need more and more help, beyond mowing? This is something you must plan for now in a time of non-crisis. If you need to juggle all kinds of people to do this and that and can't pay for any of it, then you are not truly living independently and the house becomes a burden, not a haven.

Do you have a PoA assigned for each of you (not each other but a younger relative who is trustworthy?) Do you have Living Wills created and submitted to your doctor's office and PoA? If you have all this -- excellent! If not, it is extremely important to do this asap. Some elder law attorneys will give a free 1-hour initial consult. I realize your finances are stretched thin but this is an investment with no regrets. You can read on this forum all the problems that snowball when seniors don't set legal mechanisms for their care in place. I hope your husband has a speedy and full recovery.
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Reply to Geaton777
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Check with your local Senior Center. Some will have lists of Volunteers that will do jobs for free or minimal charge.
If either you or your husband is a Veteran there are local Veterans groups that will have volunteers that will help out. The VA has various programs that help keep Veterans in their homes.
If you are active in your local Church or other religious organization they sometimes have groups that volunteer to help out.
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