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When the life insurance was taken out she

Sally, Sorry about the loss of your husband's grandmother.

Any POA ended when your husband's grandmother died. If she had a Will, then the person appointed as Executor or Personal Representative MUST follow the terms of that Will and if there were any Beneficiaries named on her checking accounts, savings accounts, mutual funds, CDs, life insurance policies, etc., they CAN NOT be changed after the person’s death by a POA or by the Executor or Personal Representative. Do you think that your husband’s sister changed the Beneficiary on his Grandmother’s life insurance policy(s) before or after she died?

You state that "his only sister is taking everything".  Is she the Executor or Personal Representative of his Grandmother's Will or was she just Grandmother's POA?  What else has his sister taken that used to belong to his Grandmother?
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Reply to DeeAnna
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I really don't see how a POA has the authority to change a beneficiary. This was who the principle wanted. Its like a will. A POA has no authority to make changes to a will.

Just read ur profile. Now Gma is gone, POA is revolked. Now the Executor takes over. If no will an administrator is assigned. POA does not give the person the right to steal.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Is it you who wants to make the change? Or are you concerned that someone else with the POA is going to do it? If the latter, have a look at the information Ahmijoy has found for you, contact the insurance company, and tell them why it is not a good idea for it to happen. At least that will slow it down.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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It depends on the documents and the wishes of the principal. It could be considered a breach of good faith for fiduciary responsibility. Based on your profile, you think the POA abused authority, correct.

Contact a lawyer.
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Reply to tacy022
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“If you are the power of attorney for another person, you will need to write a letter to the insurance company who wrote the policy.
Explain to them that you are the power of attorney and that you need to make a change in beneficiary. Explain in detail why this change needs to be made.
This is a good time to send the power of attorney documents, so the insurance company can review and approve them. The company will send you the appropriate forms that must be filled out and returned in order for the process to take place. The forms will ask for all names and social security numbers for the people involved.
You will need birthdates as well. At the time you take on the role of power of attorney, you should get this information.
Don’t wait until you need to take action, because the grant of the power may not be able to give you this information if they have become disabled.
you are the power of attorney for another person, you will need to write a letter to the insurance company who wrote the policy.
Explain to them that you are the power of attorney and that you need to make a change in beneficiary. Explain in detail why this change needs to be made.
This is a good time to send the power of attorney documents, so the insurance company can review and approve them.
The company will send you the appropriate forms that must be filled out and returned in order for the process to take place. The forms will ask for all names and social security numbers for the people involved.
You will need birthdates as well. At the time you take on the role of power of attorney, you should get this information.
Don’t wait until you need to take action, because the grant of the power may not be able to give you this information if they have become disabled.”—from an Insurance website. It sounds like the answer is yes, they can unless it’s specifically stated in the POA document that they can’t.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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