If my husband and his father just opened an account can my husband take his dad’s name off the account?

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Thank you everyone
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SB18, it sounds like your family needs to consult an attorney in your state familiar with Medicaid. You've had multiple questions and threads, and it sounds like you may end up making decisions regarding care and money that cause your FIL problems with Medicaid.  You mentioned confusion because nursing home residents at the rehab facility where your father in law was are on Medicaid. There are limited beds that Medicaid pays for in various facilities, there are limits on in-home Medicaid waivers that will NOT pay for 24/7 care in your family member's home, and bank accounts that have people's names and dollars put in and taken off will set up all kinds of red flags for medicaid.
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Whose money is in it? - is the point. Not whose name is on the account.

If it's your FIL's money it will be included in Medicaid's financial assessment whoever's name is on the account. Think about it: you can see that they are going to ask anyway about whichever source was diverted into this account. If it's savings, they will want to know what became of them. If it's a pension or annuity, where is it going? And if your FIL's assets or income are being diverted into an account which for some reason has only your husband's name on it, it may cross their nasty suspicious little minds to wonder why, and to look askance at anyone who can't give them an extremely good explanation. Medicaid are not stupid, in short.

There are legitimate reasons for removing a person's access to his own cash, such as preventing a vulnerable elder from being scammed or plain robbed if he has lost the ability to understand what is happening. Is your FIL in this sort of category?
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Will this account be looked at for Medicaid
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Your FIL will have to agree to have his name removed, and to sign off on it.
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