If my fathers ONLY asset is a property I (his daughter) own JTWROS can Medicaid take it?

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I live in Missouri, and in 1993 purchased a property and put my my parents on it JTWROS so if something happened to me they would have a place to live as my parents NEVER owned their own home. My mother passed in January of 2015, now my father has dementia and needs nursing home care, but I do not want to loose my property. Is is safe or can Medicaid make a claim on it (50% interest?) for nursing home costs Or is it all safe since it is JTWROS? I do not live in the duplex now as I purchased another home, my father has been unable to live there as I moved him in with me for care. The property is currently vacant and in much need of repairs.

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Missouri can extend MERP beyond estate recovery, as many other states already have. So you can play the odds and hope they do not pass a law any time soon. Keep an eye on upcoming legislation.
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I have seen an elder care attorney and several others not specializing in elder care and none have gave me a clear answer. They say it's best to buy my Dads interest out BUT in my research I find information leading me think it is safe as its not an asset until the death of my Dad and then it is immediately mine as the sole JTWROS. I don't really have the money without getting a loan to buy the interest out BUT would like to know definitely if that is my only protection. I do NOT understand why it is such a grey area. This financial stuff should be black and white but the lawyers I have spoke with seem wishy-washy. Even the elder care team that elder care is all their practice consists of.
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I would think it is safe since you bought it so long ago. You really need to get with an elder law attorney. Laws vary from state to state. If I were able to buy mom property I would have kept it in my name unless it was a gift. Then if considered a gift my Medicaid they certainly would be entitled to seek recovery.
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