If it isn't a urine infection, then can any other type of infection cause sudden confusion?

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My Dad at 86 is an extremely active man and so always doing something and keeping busy. Two weeks ago he suddenly started to become quite confused which is so unlike him as he's so astute and switched on. Blood and urine tests taken. There is an infection but not in the urine and they don't know where the infection is coming from. My Dad is now into the third day of taking antibiotics but no change yet. How long should we allow before we make another Drs apt as not too sure when these antibiotics should start having an effect. If it isn't a urine infection then can any other type of infection cause this sudden confusion? So very concerned at the moment so any form of positive reply would be very much appreciated. Many thanks

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Reply to jeannegibbs
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Potassium levels will make a person depressed and have Dementia symptoms. Antibiotic may not be the one for the infection. Its kind of hit and miss without a culture.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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My dad (84) was fully septic due to an untreated infection by the time he allowed himself to go to the hospital and was then there for more than a month. But during recovery after the hospital, he had several episodes when my mom would find him delirious. This was always due to either A) dehydration, or B) fever. We learned to watch him carefully and then give him fluids (in his case, diluted Sunny D, which he would drink) and aspirin. Within an hour he would be back to normal. He now knows how to recognize the signs on his own and makes sure to drink a lot of liquid each day.

For you, I hope it's something as easy as this. But don't ignore that undiagnosed infection, in the case of my dad we almost lost him because he waited to long.
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Reply to TekkieChikk
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Chikab, did you mention the woodwork/joinery to the doctor? Have you had a good look for cuts and splinters?

Also - I assume he had his chest listened to, yes? But in general, if you've got any questions or worries about how a medication should be working, it really is best to call the GP's office and speak to whoever prescribed the medication.

Wishing your Dad better very soon.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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Toxic exposure to sawdust and paint can cause confusion.  Irritation in the lungs can cause infection.
As well as an 86 y.o. overdoing it and not having the cognitive ability to stop work so as not to overdo. imo.
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Reply to Sendhelp
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Thank you for the information cdnreader. My Dad at 86 has always been so astute, articulate and so switched on. Three weeks ago he bought several pieces of wood, measured, cut, fitted and painted 6 shelves and then now suddenly he has become so very confused over these last two weeks. so my Dad was a very active man until and very suddenly this awful confusion!
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Reply to chikab
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Dear chikab,

I hope your Dad feels better soon. I found this information online. My other main concern is medications. Could your Dad have taken too much of something? Here is the link I found:



Some of the most common causes of sudden confusion include:

•an infection – urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common cause in elderly people or people with dementia.
•a stroke or TIA ("mini-stroke")
•a low blood sugar level in people with diabetes – read about treating low blood sugar.
•a head injury.

More items...




Sudden confusion (delirium) - NHS.UK



www.nhs.uk/conditions/confusion/
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Reply to cdnreader
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Thank you all for taking the time to reply, I really do appreciate it. Do antibiotics start to take effect whilst you are taking them or when the course is complete?

No I really don't think my Dad has had a fall. I'm pretty certain if this were the case then he would have mentioned something to my Mum. My Dad is so honest.
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Reply to chikab
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He has some kind of infection. He is confused. Seems most likely those two items are related. Let us know how things change as the antibiotic is completed. I sure hope that fixes things!
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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I agree with FF. Dementia doesn’t happen all of the sudden like that. However, as FrequentFlyer says, concussions and dehydration can. So can mini-strokes. If Dad isn’t showing improvement by early week, I’d definitely touch base with hisndocfor.
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