If I am loved one's DPOA, and not her guardian, do I have the right to move her out of Assisted Living against her will?

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My LO cannot afford to stay in Assisted Living. We want to move her in with us. She doesn't want to live with us. But, at the same time she doesn't really like her current Assisted Living. And, I think it is too expensive for what she is getting out of it. I have DPOA. Can I give her 30 day notice, and move her out, and in with us, even if she pitches a fit? Any advice and guidance would be much appreciated. I have to give her 30 day notice on January 1, 2018. Also, she has been diagnosed with beginning stages of dementia and mental illness. She no longer drives. And, the Assisted Living administers her daily meds. If I am only her DPOA, and not her guardian, do I have the right to move her out of Assisted Living against her will, to keep her from being kicked out due to lack of funds, at this time?

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A DPOA does not usually grant authority over such things as where the person lives, who can visit, and other personal matters. Generally it is a healthcare proxy/medical POA that deals with such matters. Do you have that, too? As rainmom advises, read the documents closely.

If your mother is able to live in assisted living, I wonder if she would be found incompetent to make her own decisions? You could not become her guardian unless she is rules incompetent.

Does the ALF she is in now accept Medicaid payments? Can they suggest other places that do? As her DPOA, what were your long-term plans, knowing she would run out of money?

Here is what your profile says about your mother: "Mom is hateful, mean, belittling, rude, and disrespectful to me only." And she has dementia, which will only get worse. I know you did not ask for an opinion about your plan to move her in with you, but, OMG, that has all the earmarks of a disaster.
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Your authority regarding your mothers care - whether you can override her choices and with or without a determination of competency - either determined/assessed by a doctor or if a legal ruling is necessary- - should all be spelled out in the DPOA document.
So do give the doc a thorough read through prior to delivering ultimatums and getting your mother all riled up - and in a state of mind to find herself a new DPOA.

But - does she understand that she is out of money - that she will be - for sure - evicted?  Has she any idea of what she’ll do when that happens?
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