The only ID provided at closing was my grandmothers voter registration card which the notary accepted. Is this legal?

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I've looked up Pennsylvania Law for notaries, but it's unclear to me if a voter I.D is an acceptable form of identification.

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The voter I.D card has her photo, but it clearly states on the card
(for voting purposes only) the I.D card does not have all the elements that a driver's license has.
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So far, every notary in Illinois and Michigan that my mother has been to has required a photo ID except for one notary that happens to know her, directly. But each state is different.

With that in-mind, here are a couple of resources that might help you. I just did an internet search for this and do not happen to know what information is in them:
http://www.nationalnotary.org/knowledge-center/tips-tutorials/determine-if-id-is-acceptable
natynotary/notary_answers.html
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As a notary, I would accept that if she could correctly draw the signature and the address is the same. If there is no signature, sorry.
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One would think a person would need a photo ID for closing for a sale of a home. My parents kept their driver's licenses even though they aren't current for driving [they stopped driving years ago], as the address is the same, and the photo still resembles them.
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