Any ideas for getting Mom to sleep in her bed?

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She is in the moderate stage of Alzheimer's and still functions quite independently. I live with her and we have a split bedroom floor plan. After I go to sleep she gets up and wanders the house most of the night finally going to sleep for a couple hours or so in her recliner in the living room.

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Garden: I disagree about the walk as it's too akin to the middle of the night walk.
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Sherry: My mother was so out of it I could have been reading Mark Twain to her and not the Word of God. It just gave her a sense of calm.
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Or perhaps she's a Native American, Muslim, Hindu, Buddhist -this is a diversified country with diversified religions.

Jeanne, your suggestion of a walk is simple, yet basic and rewarding. I think so often of the Nature Deficit Syndrome that's been identified as people spend more time indoors with electronic devices and lose contact with the basic rewards of being outside.

It's especially nice now as the heat has left and the autumn coolness is so refreshing.

You might even meet some neighbors working outside, walking their dogs (good therapy for young, middle and older folks to get acquainted with the local canine population). Perhaps a cup of one of the herbal teas that's sleep inducing when you return would be a nice way to end the day.
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Dear Llama lover, what if she is an atheist? or what if her spiritual path is Wicca or if she is Jewish. Scripture is not going to help, but rather hinder. TCO Biz, how about taking your mother for a late afternoon walk, get her tired, let her have a hot bath/shower and tuck her in? Also check for the UTI, a sure sign of this for my mother is wandering at night
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TCO, there are a variety of activities, some of which are free, both you and your mother could enjoy, depending on your interests.

Depending also on her cognitive level, you could try local senior citizen's centers, your community's recreational activities (which used to be called adult ed in my area), which sometimes include simple classes.

Libraries have various programs, including free concerts. They might be the most appealing to your mother. In our area, there are generally several free music programs throughout the summer, waning off in the fall, and sometimes being offered again around Christmas.

If she has any interest in crafts and can follow visual cues, Michael's and Jo-anns both have crafts classes.

Museums have rotating exhibits.

I don't know if being in public with a lot of strangers might be distracting though.
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Thanks for all the input you guys! It was really a nice feeling to have so many people respond, a feeling I haven't had in quite some time. And your right, as long as she is not in harms way I'm not going to fuss at her. I've been living with her for 19 months now and I do have A lot to be grateful for. She is very easy to take care of. The only thing I have to deal with is extreme isolation and loneliness because I moved up here from Florida and I have no one here no friends and no one in the family helps. there is only one sister-in-law and two nieces and I have seen them maybe once since I've been up here.
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I bought dad a deluxe foam mattress topper to go on top of the hospital bed mattress. It is unbelievably comfortable. We keep the head of the bed elevated to 45 degrees at all times due to his history of aspiration. I also got the most comfy pillows and quilt. Mom would never allow a recliner in her home, so his bed is really his only sleep spot. He broke his hip 3 years ago by dozing off in a chair and falling over. Now he is never left unattended for more than a moment. A night time caregiver, too.
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Scripture reading if she still understands God's name or his Hebrew name, Elohim.
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Is she safe alone at night? If she functions pretty independently in the day time, can she function as well at night? Then I don't see this as a problem.

If she keeps you awake at night, this is a problem.

If she is apt to take a few extra pills at night, or turn on burners, etc., this is a problem.

Could you provide a little more information?
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Sofas are warmer, definitely. The back of the sofa provides protection from the cold air in the wintertime. Unless someone sleeps with a massive large pillow next to their back, a bed just doesn't provide the wintertime warmth that a sofa does.

One option might be to switch her regular bed for a daybed. It's wider in the cushion area than a sofa, but it also has a back as a sofa does so it can protect against winter chills.

I slept on the sofa for several months when my mother stayed with me and I gave her my bed. I actually grew to like it. For an older person who might be vulnerable, a sofa provides a backing protection.
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