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I am only 60 but went through a lot of money and heartache to get conservatorship of my Mom due to her dementia and a UTI. She would not give me any decisions to make for her. It was a mess. I do not want my family to go through that with me.

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The "springing" type of POA seems to be very popular here on the forum, but getting it sprung has been a real roadblock for some people. My mom's POA was en force as soon as the ink was dry and I was able to help her with banking and bill payments long before she became incapacitated. The way I look at it setting up POA is kind of like selecting a guardian for your minor children, something you tuck away and hopefully never need. If, however, you have any doubts about the trustworthiness of those in your family then a springing POA may be the only way to go.
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Reply to cwillie
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Sooner the better, really. A springing DPOA comes into force only when it's needed - bearing in mind it may never be needed, of course - and otherwise just sits in the file minding its own business. Thus, there are zero drawbacks to having it ready; just remember to revisit it every so often to make sure it's still fit for purpose.
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Reply to Countrymouse
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Ok thank you I appreciate your response.
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Reply to Trisha1958
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I think you can set it up now, with the provision that the POA ONLY kicks in when you are proven to be incapable of making your own decisions.
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Reply to againx100
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