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If I lived in a boarder town I would check into hiring a caregiver from across the border, you can hire multiple people and they can legally cross back and forth and you will spend a fraction of the money that an agency would charge. They can do a couple of 24 hour shifts or 8 hour days. You could also find a couple of single woman that you can sponsor and have them live in with mom, if it is a good situation you would never be without a caregiver because you could sponsor additional people and your current caregivers would have them lined up for you.

24/7/365 caregiving is not realistic for 1 person, please read the posts here from burned out and sick caregivers that tried to do it solo. Keep that in mind when arranging for caregivers.
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Geaton777 Aug 4, 2019
Hiring people from across the border may not change the fact that the US govt may view them as her employees requiring all the attendant reporting, taxes and paperwork. I would research this very carefully before recommending going down this path unless you have first-hand experience with it. Also, hiring individuals means she won't necessarily know their experience levels or criminal histories (think financial elder abuse). Caregiver agencies are more money per/hr for a reason. Their people are vetted, and she will have substitutes if her caregiving is sick, goes on vacation or quits suddenly. She will also have recourse if their caregiver is incompetent or acts inappropriately in any way.
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Inexpenseve is relative to what you think it is and what is reality. If you called around and got ballpark figures, that is the going rate. It covers salaries, taes and insurance. If you find someone who is inexpensive, make sure you cover all of the bases. Back injuries are common when alone as a caregiver so it is important to cover the caregiver.
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Visiting Angels if they have a franchise near you. Or other private in-home care services, but VA is national and I've been very happy with them in FL.
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The Alzheimer's Assn. has been extremely helpful in providing lists of various sources and resources for a variety of care issues, including in home care.   They're quick to respond by e-mail (within 1/2 hour generally) as opposed to the Area Agency on Aging, which typically took a week.

There are many important and critical aspects of in-home care, ranging from how the worker will be paid (employee vs. independent contractor), time off, and more.

There have been a number of posts on this subject over the years; you can use the search function to find other posts and glean information from them.

You might consider creating a work scope, or checklist, of what you want in a caregiver, as well as other issues to research.

This is a challenging task, and it can be frustrating.   Make sure to take ample time off inbetween searches and interviews so you don't become frustrated.
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You should have an area on aging or other government agency to ask those kinds of questions, check the internet and call local hospice and ask if any there knows of a place. Good Luck
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