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How do I go about getting it Her heart is at 25%,dementia,ra
diabetic and more.She will not consent to sign her house over (not worth much)but I need help

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she doesn't need hospice but she can't be left alone.my sister stayed this week she was off work. i got to work a full wk but the rest of the month is a day here and there.
mom refuses to let the state take her house ,it'snot worth much.i'm going to check into adult daycare?? thanks
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If your mom can get by with only having someone around about 3 hours/day, the Area Office on Aging has a Waiver program, the actual name differs in each state. There may be a waiting list. A relative did not have to go on a list because she was leaving the nursing home for home. She was already on Medicaid and approved immediately. She doesn't have to pay 1 penny, nor does she have to lift a finger at home. On the other hand, another relative in a neighboring state, who still lives at home, would have had to be put on that state's waiting list for up to a year. She chose to not even apply. It depends.

My relative actually needs more than 3 hrs/day care. I am available to fill in the gaps. It sounds like your mom needs actually nursing care +. Three hours/day is all this program can provide. Other than this, there are no other programs available unless your mom may qualify for hospice.
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Two - Generally - medicare or medicade will not pay for in home care. You can pay for adult day care but it's spendy. You can also hire someone to come IN but that's also spendy. To best understand what's available in your area, look for Area Agency on Aging in the phone book and talk with them.

If your mom's heart is functioning at 25%, you should speak with Mom's doctor about the need for skilled nursing care (nursing home) or a hospice. Your mom can have hospice care at home or in a nursing home. If it's at home, they usually come in periodically but won't stay 24-7.

Don't worry about signing anything over, the state will place a lien on her home - after all of her other cash assets are used up - and recoup their expenditures after she passes away. This is the norm unless there is a surviving spouse or a disabled adult child that needs to live in the home.

Good luck.
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