I live with my Father in NC who has dementia. I'm POA but have not used it yet. Should I have my name on his bank accounts ?

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He has upcoming appointment with neurologist and I expect an Alzheimer's diagnosis. He has already been diagnosed with dementia. I am concerned I be able to access his funds for his care and honestly also for his final expenses and costs concerning the home if he should pass while I am living there. I want him to be cared for at home as long as possible. How is it best to have this set up at bank? He is still able to communicate but the dementia is quickly worsening. Thank you.

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Thank goodness your POA at least you can give that to the bank and get set up as POA to write checks but make sure to put POA after your signature. I just went through this with my mom. Bank set me up as POA on her account but in order to add me to account they wanted her to come into bank. She was unable to. I eventually went to a credit union opened another account in her name and me as a signer but that took some work & getting a notary. If you can get parent to bank to add you with their permission it's easier. Also depends on the banking institution some are easier to work with then others so check with them to see what they require.
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I got the forms from the bank and had my dad sign them at home when his dementia was beginning. Your bank may or may not allow this but it’s worth asking about.  I had poa at the time.  You may need that.
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You need to take him to the bank with you because you still need his permission.  Mom has severe dementia but it was not a problem even adding another sibling's name
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Yes indeed, get on those accounts! I have been on Moms ( and dads when he was with me) and it makes Everything easier! Mom;s handwriting is so bad now,, I write all her checks ( I do put POA after it, but my name is listed on the top line with hers) I am an only child, but you can still never be too careful!
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NCdaughter, if you are able, take Dad to the bank with you. Take him during the time of day when his mind thinks a bit clearer. I found it worked out so much better having my Dad with me at the bank, so he was able to tell the Bank Manager he wanted my name jointly on his accounts. I also brought along the original of the Power of Attorney just in case the bank needed to make a copy.

Do what Hugemom suggested above, do this now. Make this a high priority. I also kept copies of bills paid, like Hugemom recommended. What I did was xerox the invoice with the check somewhere on the invoice, and into a 3-ring binder the copy went.

Since you live with Dad, make sure you get the mail from the mailbox first. The reason for this is that you get the bills before your Dad does. My Dad use to throw away bills thinking it was junk mail, I found a good share of bills in the recycling... oops.
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Get to the bank as soon as you can, like now or tomorrow, and have your name put on Dad’s bank accounts. Even with POA, having a joint account is so much easier. Years ago, my mom was savvy enough to put my name on anything important. It was so much easier when she passed!

As long as you are on his accounts, there should be no issues with your signing checks when you need money to care for his needs. I would caution you that when you do use his money, keep each and every receipt. Start a filing system for that and for any other important papers. You never know when you’ll need to prove something.
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