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175# man with dementia. Can’t hold on nor cooperate during lift...only one caregiver there to put him from the bed to the wheelchair. Is there a way one caregiver can move him??

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DiLizzy, I use a manual Hoyer lift alone with my father routinely. It isn't a problem when you are trained by an OT or PT or other pro on how to use it and get sufficient practice. (Although I can certainly understand what DeeAnna says about "oops moments".)

My dad is a quadriplegic and is unable to hold on and just is passively lifted, etc. He doesn't have dementia. Is your loved one fighting back, becoming confused? That WOULD be scary in a lift, working alone, for sure.
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cwillie, How right you are that "There aren't different lifts just different rules for agencies and those of us who have to live in the real world, facilities and home care agencies usually insist on a two person transfer with any lift."

If the Hoyer Lift is going to be used in your home, then most likely there is only one person available to use the lift; if the Hoyer Lift is used in a facility or by a hired or licensed health care worker, then they are required by law and by the worker's comp insurance company to use two people. It comes down to where the lift is being used and by whom; and whether the person using the lift is willing to take full responsibility for any accidents or injuries (to the person being lifted or themselves) that occur during the lift.
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There are Manual and Powered Hoyer Lifts. They operate similarly, except the Manual Hoyer Lifts have hydraulic cylinders and a hand-pump to move the Boom up and down (and open & close the lift legs) where as the Powered Hoyer Lifts have rechargeable battery packs and a pushbutton hand control to more the Boom up and down (and open & close the left's legs).

For safety reasons, 98% of all healthcare facilities have Policies and Procedures that state that "the Hoyer Life transfer MUST be performed with TWO PEOPLE".

While you can have only ONE person use the POWERED Hoyer Lift with the rechargeable battery packs and a pushbutton hand control, the level of safety decreases then when you have TWO PEOPLE during the transfer.

Here is a manual on Hoyer Lifts:
www.cdss.ca.gov/agedblinddisabled/res/VPTC2/4%20Care%20for%20the%20Caregiver/How_to_Use_a_Hoyer_Lift.pdf

Review the manual and note that most pictures have TWO people involved in the transfer. The reason for two people is that if the patient becomes uncooperative or fidgets or tries to get out of the sling during the transfers, then one person can control the Hoyer Lift and one person can attempt to calm the patient and assist in guiding the sling and the patient's body and legs to the proper position on the bed or in the wheelchair.

All kinds of things can go WRONG during a transfer with a Hoyer Lift. "I have been there and done that." It would take me several paragraphs to describe all of the problems and accidents and "Oops Moments" that I have experienced over the years while using the Hoyer Lift.

While I understand your problem, I DO NOT recommend that only one person be present while transferring a person with dementia who most likely can not understand what is going on and most likely is going to be uncooperative during the transfer. It is very important that the patient lie quietly in the sling during the transfer, otherwise the Hoyer Lift could become unbalanced and TIP OVER!

I am wondering if the reason the man with dementia does not cooperate during lifts is because his dementia is not allowing him to understand what you are doing. Maybe he thinks that he is falling while he is hanging in mid-air in the sling. and he is trying to find a way to stop his fall.

What type of lift have you used to transfer this man with? How is he uncooperative? There is no easy answer to this problem without compromising safety. Sorry :(
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There aren't different lifts just different rules for agencies and those of us who have to live in the real world, facilities and home care agencies usually insist on a two person transfer with any lift.
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