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The hospital does not get him up in a chair when I am there he is in bed. The note on the board says to turn him every 2 hours and monitor his blood level. Why do they not get him out of bed? I want to bring him home but with him in bed 24 hrs. will cause contractors and not be able to move no PT.

most of the time he just sleeps. his appetite is good. I am supposed to talk to the dr. today to have him discharged, I want to bring him home not a nh. this time he is in the hospital because he started bleeding rectally. they did a procedure and found a small cut. the dr. said wanted to keep an eye to see if it stopped on it's own but after a few days it started again so they repeated the procedure to clip it and stop the bleeding the problem is NO ONE nows if it was clipped or not just that it stopped bleeding, and stable.
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Reply to bharty615
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You said in your profile that your husband has age related decline.
 I have had patients who could only tolerate 10 minutes sitting up in a chair and then they are exhausted. Most probably, you would not be witness to that, due to the short amount of time he'd be up. He also may be refusing to get up. You can't force someone to get out of bed.

If there is a sign to turn every 2 hours, there's a good chance that, since he can't turn himself, he can't tolerate sitting up either. Some patients are just too weak.

If I were you I would contact your husband's doctor (or the hospital doctor taking care of him) and find out what's going on. I would ask for PT to do range of motion exercises with him to prevent contractures. Talk with the day shift nurse as she is on the shift most often to get patients out of bed. But, as Veronica said, if he has orders to turn him side to side, he's very ill.

You need to be in closer communication with his care team (doctor, nurse, social worker/discharge planner).
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Reply to SueC1957
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I understand your worry and frustration. During dad’s many hospitalizations, I would very politely request daily that he be transferred to the chair. I would have to follow up and make sure that it happened. Sometimes, I would ask for the physical therapist to help, just in case. If he started to get dizzy when seated in the chair, he’d be transferred back to bed.
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Reply to yogagirl
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NY daughter in law as you say they would certainly be monitoring him for blood glucose levels and checkinh his oxygen saturation. it did not sound as simple as that.

Patients who are a fall risk certainly can be walked and moved from bed to chair. They are just not allowed to move from bed or chair without assistance. Can be very annoying if they are late answering a call bell and you are desperate for the bathroom.
Patients are usually identified with colored wrist bands or wear a certain colored gown. Patients are instructed about the rules and often assessed by a physical therapist and walked by PT for the first time. One or two aides usually perform the transfers and help with some walking. For very heavy patients a Hoyer lift is often used. for transfers.
People who are critically ill or have other reasons to not be moved from their beds just need to remain in bed. Staff do get everyone up who is capable so there is a good reason while this gentleman is kept in bed.
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Reply to Veronica91
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They could be monitoring his blood levels for glucose and oxygen, and his blood pressure for being too low or too high. If he is a fall risk, he cannot be walked. I don't know if transferring a patient who is a fall risk into a chair is standard practice.

What is he in the hospital for this time?
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Reply to NYDaughterInLaw
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If he is being turned every two hours he is a very sick man. What do they mean by monitoring his blood? is he getting blood transfusions?
What exactly are his health problems? being sat in a chair for hours on end is very very uncomfortable plus your legs are often down which is very bad for circulation. being up and walked around is a far better option. Talk to his Dr and find out what is really going on. Is he eating and drinking?
Come back and give us more information please.
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Reply to Veronica91
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I agree that first you need to find out why he is not being transferred to a chair. If it is mainly a matter of not being able to watch him one-on-one, could his new aide spend her shift visiting him? Could you ask to have him transferred to a chair while you are visiting? I'm not suggesting that the aide or you provide any direct care -- just visit with him and ensure he doesn't try to get out of the chair.

This assumes that he is alert and there is no medical reason for him to lie flat.
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Reply to jeannegibbs
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I'm just speculating here. Is he conscious and alert? If not, then that's a big reason. If so, is he independent? If not, sitting in a chair is risky compared to laying in bed. In bed he has the bed alarm so if he tries to get up, they have plenty of warning to get there. In a chair, even if they put a alarm leash on him, he'll be up long before they can get there. Not all hospitals have the resources to put a sitter in his room 24/7.
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Reply to needtowashhair
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What did the nurses or aides advise about getting him out of bed and in a chair? Is he too weak at this point? Isn't it possible he's up and in a chair when you're not there?

The best way to find out why the staff isn't getting him up is to talk to them directly; they have access to the charts, which we don't, and all we can do is guess.

Call the floor he's on at the hospital, today, and ask to speak to his nurse. I did regularly when my father was hospitalized.
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Reply to GardenArtist
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