Follow
Share

I just turned 64. Next year is the big 65! My husband is only a few months older than me. Just wondering how heavily we should be insured. Your thoughts? Humana or something similar?


I put this under a general category of senior health. Nothing else seemed to apply.

Find Care & Housing
It is confusing, NHWM! My husband is 67. He needed to enroll (or make the call to Medicare) 3 months prior to his 65th BD.
He is covered under my insurance and has been for decades as he is a small business owner.
My insurance for him is primary. He has Part A now but that only covers in patient (hospitalization). I will continue to work FT as I am 61 & my SS date to receive full SS is 66 yrs 8 months. If I stop working before then I lose $1 k a month in SS benefits. I too will enroll when I am 65 but that’s way off in my case.
I will never choose an Advantage plan.
I can’t wait to retire. The coming 5 years to wait seems like an eternity!
I looked into receiving early retirement at 62 but financially can’t sustain it. I would like to work part time @ 62 as I have worked since I was 15 yrs old & 40 years as a RN this past May. I am tired.
But that’s not to be so no sense even thinking about it so off to work I go...
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to Shane1124
Report
NoTryDoYoda Nov 24, 2019
My wife retires 2 1/2 years before I do. She is covered under my health insurance and thus will not get supplemental with medicare until I turn 65.
(0)
Report
I would recommend finding an insurance broker that specializes in Medicare.

I am not a broker but just a few things, I learned. There are two types of “add-ons” to Medicare. One type is a supplement. Supplements are for doctors and hospital expenses. They do not cover prescriptions. Or, teeth, or eyes - unless related to some specific medical condition. There are other supplements for prescriptions which are recommended if you go the supplement route. Teeth and eyes supplements usually have small coverage and waiting periods so do the math for break even on buying those. The company that you sign up with - within 90 days of your birthday who will provide either F or G supplement plans have to guarantee to cover you for life - as long as you keep your payments up. Supplements do cost $ but the monthly fee is usually lower than our dr visits or certainly a single day in a hospital.

The other option is Advantage plans. Some of these plans can be at $0 cost. But, you will have an out of pocket amount and copays. Some Advantage plans include prescriptions, teeth, and eyes. Some do have a monthly fee.

However, as our population ages - we are already seeing programs go away or leave certain zip codes. So, please consider the long term “assurance” of having coverage, as well as, the prospect of zero or lower monthly cost plus that out of pocket and copay.

I had to take an Advantage plan when I went on disability because the Supplement plan was price prohibitive. But, the Advantage plan ended up costing me a small fortune because of all of my out of pocket and copay expenses.

When I just recently turned 65, I participated in my 65 enrollment and immediately chose Supplemental plans for my coverage. I’m paying monthly premiums - but no more big surprises except maybe my teeth.

Everyone’s personal situation is different and your husband’s company may carry you both into and after retirement. Even so - this is rare today and we’ve already seen plans go bankrupt and stop the coverage for retirees. So, each situation has to be evaluated for your specific circumstances.

Good luck! And, please get professional help. They are paid by the insurance companies - not by you. Some organizations provide free help and are not incented by one plan or another.
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to WifeNeedingHelp
Report

Llama,

I did stop dying my hair awhile back. I got tired of the expense. I earned my silver hair!

There are some people who never stop dying their hair and that’s okay too. Some people look fine with dyed hair until they die. It just depends. Blondes get away with it better. Dark hair can look a bit fake or harsh.

Don’t kid yourself thinking it’s just women. Lots of older men dye their hair and get face lifts, manicures too, just like women do.

Not a fan, not my cup of tea but Wayne Newton comes to mind. Geeeeez, in his 70’s with jet black hair! Alrighty then. Don’t think so! Plastic surgery disaster!

Look at George Clooney. So good looking! I think he is more handsome now than he was younger. He looks fantastic with his salt and pepper hair!
Helpful Answer (0)
Reply to NeedHelpWithMom
Report

Need: That's right! Some days I have to say to myself "Wait a sec - you're 72, you know. What were you thinking taking on so much?" LOL😁😁
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Llamalover47
Report

NeedHelpWithMom: You're very welcome. But don't refer to yourself "as not getting any younger" till you're a septuagenarian! I have almost 9 years on you. LOL.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to Llamalover47
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 27, 2019
Hahaha, Llama. We are as young as we feel, right? NOT!!! But it’s a nice thought 😊
(1)
Report
My wife turns 65 in January. She's covered by my insurance. We are each on medicare already via disability, but my insurance serves as a secondary insurance for both of us. She will stay on my insurance until I turn 65 in 3 years and then we will get a supplemental together.
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to NoTryDoYoda
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 27, 2019
I appreciate this info. Seems like a lot of people have already checked into this and I just started thinking about it. Yikes! I have to catch up to all of you.
(0)
Report
I, too, am in the same situation as you — turn 65 next year & currently covered by husband’s insurance. I started researching it a few days ago and, after spending hours on it, came away with A = hospitalizations, B = doctors etc, D = drugs and that 20% not covered can bankrupt us in the case of a major disease. Also came away with a spinning head, realizing I need help in figuring this out. Sigh.......
Helpful Answer (2)
Reply to kdcm1011
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 27, 2019
Yeah, 65 will be here before we know it!
(0)
Report
See 1 more reply
This is not a direct answer but caution you and your husband to be sure and apply for Medicare in the narrow window starting 3 months before your birthday and ending 3 months after in order to get Part A & B as you must have Part B in order to get supplement insurance (this since Obama care came in and prohibited insurance companies from issuing policies to people over 65 without Part B). Just a caution.
Helpful Answer (4)
Reply to kmclaurin3coxt
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 27, 2019
I’m going to have to discuss all of this soon with hubby. Thanks so much.
(0)
Report
See 2 more replies
NeedHelpWithMom: When it was time for myself to sign up for Medicare, we used a pro bono insurance agent who came to the house and set it all up. First, I did not sign up for Medicare at age 65 as I was covered under my husband's employer. However, so that I did not incur the penalty when I did sign up, I had to have a letter written by my husband's employer, stating that I had medical insurance. Okay - onto the Medicare Supplemental - Yes, do obtain it. The insurance agent we worked with set up the proper Medicare Supplemental Plan AND plan "Letter." We went with AARP through United Health Care and after addressing all of my needs, used plan Letter "F." Now mind you - while I was living out of state caring for my mother, I had to use that areas' ER services. I never owed one penny! I am about to turn 73 in January and have never owed a penny. Of course, you do have to pay the Medicare Supp premiums.
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to Llamalover47
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 27, 2019
Llama,

Good to know. Geeeez. There is a lot to prepare for. Thanks. Not used to thinking about myself! Took care of mom for so long.

But I am not getting any younger! We have more years behind us than ahead. We are approaching this Medicare stage very soon!
(1)
Report
I am happy to add to what everyone else has to say. It is imperative that you see your Social Security office soon. You MUST apply for Medicare around your 65th birthday. They will penalize you if you don't. I have Medicare and GEHA (Government Employees Health Assocation). I pay each month but don't pay deductibles. My hubby has Medicare and AARP. He uses his union insurance for prescriptions. he doesn't have any deductible.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to MaryKathleen
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Thanks, Mary Kathleen.

Can this be done online or must I go into the physical building? Just wondering.
(0)
Report
We are going through this now. My husband worked until last month and we are both covered under his insurance until Dec 31st. I contacted Medicare and there is a form I downloaded to have our HR department complete confirming we have been continually covered since age 65. Submitting this stops the penalty for signing up for Part B and drug Part D after age 65. We have completed the application to start Medicare parts B & D January 1, 2020 and a supplemental AARP United Healthcare policy. I am 65 and my husband is 67. His premium will come out of his SS check and I will.pay quarterly.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to humkat
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Thanks for info. Appreciate it.
(0)
Report
After my wife and I retired we had, of course, Medicare. We also had a supplement through Blue Cross of Michigan. We were perfectly happy with BC but they really bumped up the premiums we paid. We talked to an excellent insurance agent who saved us a ton of money each month by going with AARP United Healthcare. Seriously, we saved several hundred per month. The same was true when our agent found much better Part D drug insurance. Co-pays were comparable to those we had with Anthem BC but for my wife, her monthly cost dropped from $175 to $23!!! My savings were comparable. In other words, shop around and don't be afraid to change companies and policies if you're dealing with an agent you trust.
Helpful Answer (4)
Reply to Allencic
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Thanks. It is a decision that I want us to be careful deciding about so I don’t regret it.
(1)
Report
See 1 more reply
Please be careful as you plan...medical crises can happen when we least expect it and unless you are a lottery winner or a millionaire, could wipe you and your future out financially. So for sure get a supplemental, and realize that our wonderful country has it set up so that if you are healthy and dare to NOT sign on for the drug coverage, they will penalize you for every month you go without.

The advantage plans SOUND so wonderful...why do you think they are running all those commercials...promising you the world...but you will be limited in your choices and they will dictate all the conditions of who what when where and why...IF your providers are listed, lucky you...but that's today...what if they drop out tomorrow? Or maybe to you, it doesn't matter...so it could be a good thing.

My folks have Medicare and then United Health Care thru AARP of which they are members...it seems to be a good way to go and I have found their staff to be responsive, helpful, and speak clearly:-)

We can't be without the health coverage, but I will say I just dropped my workplace offered dental/vision combo. We had switched plans and so we had one where if you saw someone out of network (all of my providers are) of course it paid less and of what THEY determined was allowable at 80%, after a deductible...so when I sat down and did some math I found my premiums and my out of pocket for just one visit totaled about $850. The out of pocket was $514. It's a scam. The vision part: they had one on-line provider. More discount because they were IN network. Check it out with another place I'd used before...and even with the discounts at the in network, with a discount from the out of network I'm still saving about $50.

Caution is the word:-)
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to gdaughter
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
A lot to consider, for sure. Thanks.
(1)
Report
A good source of information is through your state’s health benefits counseling service, SHIP (State Health Insurance Assistance Program).
SHIPs are free, state counseling services that help seniors understand their Medicare, Medicare Advantage, Medigap (Medicare Supplemental Insurance) and Medicaid benefits. Anyone with Medicare related questions is free to call a SHIP's counselor even if they are not currently enrolled in Medicare.
https://www.payingforseniorcare.com/longtermcare/resources/state_health_insurance_programs.html
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to Autumn50
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Appreciate it. Will check it out.
(0)
Report
I do know Medicare requires you to at least “register “ within a certain time period around your 65th birthday. Otherwise you will pay a penalty every month until you die even after 100+!
I am 63 and have already talked to our local Social Security (SS) office about dates for SS which for me is after my 66th birthday. So I need my Medicare to start at age 65. Be careful (I learned ) about the dates for when Medicare should start withdrawing payments. Something to do with your birth date- early in the month or later in the month.
My employer’s retirement company is Fidelity. I recently talked with them about Medicare and SS and learned important details. Fidelity has been offering Live Webinars with their staff for question and answers. Be sure your husband is set up for email offers or check with his retirement/HR Dept to guide him and you.
My local Senior Center offers offers information sessions on Medicare and SS too which were helpful.
I know other people answered with the same guidance so all good info!
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Nurse2018
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Geeez, so I’m behind the game. Thanks for sharing your information with me.
(2)
Report
For what it's worth : When when we both worked, hubby did not have any insurance through his job. He was on my policy from the hospital where I worked. He's two years older than me. When he hit age 65 our insurance automatically switched to his coverage being only a supplement. We were required to get Medicare for him. The same happened when I hit 65 . I had to get Medicare and my coverage with my job became a supplemental. The amount we pay for the supplemental was approximately two-thirds of what we used to pay for the full coverage. Unfortunately we now also pay four hundred + dollars, each, every 3 months for the Medicare. Resulting in actually paying more now than we used to make sure you apply for Medicare early enough. At least three months before you hit 65. Or there might be a delay
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to DoingbestIcan
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
Interesting, isn’t it? How all of these policies work.
(0)
Report
The other thing that larger companies do is at 65, if you are still employed, you (or your dependent) go on medicare a&b and their health insurance becomes a supplemental insurance. This is usually at a cost savings passed on to you too. Just before retirement you will need to find your own supplemental insurance policy but will be able to enroll because retirement is considered a life changing event instead of waiting for open enrollment. There are very few large companies that actually offer to let you and your dependents continue your supplemental health insurance thru them at employee cost as part if your pension depending on the number of service years you have. Great idea to check not only the hr department but also their retirement planning department (assuming they have one if company is that large).
Helpful Answer (6)
Reply to Takincare
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 26, 2019
I really don’t know anything about the policy. I should know. Everyone’s post has made me realize that I need to research what is available.
(2)
Report
Here's the thing.

Check with his HR department right away. Follow what they tell you to do. You can get hit with lifelong financial penalties if you mess this up.

Medicare is individual, so there is no more " being on his policy" for either Part A or B. I made this mistake last year.

His company probably requires him to get Part A at age 65 as his primary insurance. You need to find out if you are automatically covered until YOU are 65.

If he doesn't required Part B because he can show comparable coverage, there is a form that will need to be filled out by HR proving that he had that coverage. Same for you when you turn 65.

Get the book "Medicare for Dummies" and read it. It will help you understand what I mean.
Helpful Answer (10)
Reply to BarbBrooklyn
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 24, 2019
Thanks Barb, I’m glad you told me this. I guess it’s time to research this topic. It’s a large company. Headquarters are in New York. Will look into it.
(3)
Report
I would first see how his employer handles those employees that reach Medicare age. Also, what your husband receives if he retires.

My husband is a UAW retiree. We both get Medicare and the UAW supplies our supplimental, me paying a small sum a month to cover me.

Some employees can continue with full coverage if still working but I would contact Medicare to see how that needs to be handled. Medicare charges more monthly if a person didn't take it at 65. I think there is an allowance made if the person continues to work.

When u get this info together, call your Office of Aging and ask if they help people "sort" all this out.
Helpful Answer (3)
Reply to JoAnn29
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 24, 2019
I see. Thanks so much for the info.
(0)
Report
Is he retired? Are you retired?
The retirement insurance might be a bit different than the one he has while working.
There are counselors you can talk to about what policies are better for you.
Also contact the retirement board and see what the requirements are.
I know with my insurance I can not get a supplement as it will drop other parts of my coverage.
So it all depends on how the retirement policy is worded.
Helpful Answer (1)
Reply to Grandma1954
Report
NeedHelpWithMom Oct 24, 2019
Grandma,

He’s still working. I stopped working. I just started thinking about it because we will be 65 next year. Guess I could have looked into it sooner but it wasn’t on my mind.
(1)
Report

Ask a Question

Subscribe to
Our Newsletter