How can I make my husband's grandfather stop unplugging everything?

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He is 89 with Alzheimer's . It's about 2 yrs since it started . My husband and I are his POA and caregivers. After a year of not working to take care of him , we couldn't afford it. I got a job and we got him on title 19 and now have help. The aides try to tell him to stop and so do we. Here's the problem , he unplugs the air conditioning while its on , multiple times a day if he gets cold . We set it on low , keep doors open and he has blankets . Its been dangerously humid in CT and we are trying to keep him safe, not cold . Instead of turning the air conditioner off he pulls the plug. Thus is very dangerous and at my leaset concern He will break the a/c's. * we don't have much money to get new ones* my biggest fear is a fire . He unplugs the cable box everynight so everymorning it has to reboot. As far as I know that's not dangerous , just aggrivating to all involved . We know of a house burning to the ground because of a short in an a/c. I've explained all I could and the best I could but he's stubborm, has ocd and alzheimer's , so it's like talking to a wall. Any suggestions ????? We are trying to keep him in his house . But this is dangerous . He can't be watched 24/7 to make sure he doesn't unplug stuff. We all live in the home, he could hurt us all.

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Thank you all . I appreciate the feedback and support and understanding. A btacket or cover sounds like a good start.
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I suppose it's possible that there is some logical reasoning behind the unplugging, however, it's just as likely that there is no reason.

My cousin would unplug the cable box from the tv and hide it, unplug the radio, and she lost the ability to understand how a thermostat works. I think in many cases, it's just them keeping in motion with no real motive for the actions. It's just something to do and the don't remember they did it. Because of that, no reasoning or convincing will help them stop.

The only options that I am aware of is constant supervision and redirecting when he goes towards the outlets or circuit box. I did install a clear protective box on the AC/Heat thermostat that could only be opened with a key.

You may be able to locate or fashion a protective plastic cover, like the ones that go over thermostats onto wall outlets, but I would check with an electrician first to see if it's legal. It could have safety issues.
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Nettiem, it just occurred to me that you could contact the electrical supplier and ask if they have any kind of plug protectors.
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I was thinking the same thing as FF, that he's thinking of the cost of electricity and pulling the plug for that reason. Or it could just be that he's cold and doesn't know how to shut it off. I'm wondering if you use a label or something close to the on/off switch and write in big letters something to the effect of TURN THIS BUTTON OFF.

If it weren't for the dementia issue, I wouldn't disagree with turning it off, properly though. Even young people are becoming more conscious of wasted phantom electricity from appliances left plugged in but not running.
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Another idea is a timer clock on the plug... tell Dad that the A/C will go off at 10 a.m. and come back on at 1pm, and on at 3pm and off at 7pm [or whatever times the clock is set, you can have multiple on/off times]. Make a game out of it, just before 10 a.m. have Dad sit in front of the A/C and listen for the A/C to go off, then for him to come out and tell you. Maybe that will satisfy him.
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Nettiem79, don't forget your Dad was a child of the Great Depression where everyone conserved everything.... so your Dad pulling out the plugs is probably doing what he learned as a child [since which memory issues some resort back to being a child].

There are outlet plug covers where you plug in the A/C and then put this cap which locks over it, Babies R Us sells it. Your Dad may or may not figure out how to release it.

Now decades ago I saw a small medal clip that slips over the plug and then you screw the clip onto the outlet face plate. Not sure if this will work as your Dad could rip the whole plug apart and damage the face plate. Check with your local hardware store.
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Yes, I call her every day and ask what the temp is. If it's higher than 80, I wait while she gets up to close her windows and turn on her AC. I made the mistake a few days ago to talk to her and she was going to get up and do it when we finished our conversation. When I called a few hours later, it was 84 and she had the fan on. My brother calls her on Sundays and I've instructed him every week to make her get up while he's on the phone and wait for her to do it and report back. It's challenging! Some things will stick with her...and I'm hoping your mom's story will!
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Probably not, sorry to say. We got my mom a large figured thermometer, and told her that when it hit 80, she had to turn on the AC. It didn't work. I'd open the door to her apartment and get hit in the face with the heat. So sad. My best to your mom.
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Babalou I'm printing out your answer for my mom. She argues with me about this every day, when her place is 84 degrees and I tell her to shut her windows and turn on her AC. It's always, "I don't feel the heat" and I'm always responding, "Old people DON'T feel the heat, which is why they overheat and die from heatstroke." Here in Chicago during a bad heat spell in 1995 over 700 seniors died. We go through this DAILY. ARGGGGH!!! She might pay attention to your mom's story!
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I want to say that when my mom lived in Independent Living, she resisted running the AC, was always cold. Her doctor told her how bad the heat and humidity were for her heart and her bp, to no avail. She had a stroke and is now in a nursing home where the temperature is kept at a pleasant 72 for staff and residents. There is a plentiful supply of shawls and blankets for those who are cold. I no longer feel like I'm going to the sauna when I visit mom.
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