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I am "wife no. 2" and one daughter is being very invasive, insisting on going through personal files that include financial information, what our expenses are, etc. Since I'm POA, I feel it is none of her business and feel as if it's an invasion of privacy. Any input would be appreciated.

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I am a second wife also. I am so happy to have had the support of my three stepdaughters as well as my two sons as I cared for my husband through his dementia.

But I have seen heartbreaking situations of interference from the stepchildren of the caregiver, in my local support group. This can really get ugly! I am so sorry you are not in a supportive situation.

You really have a duty, as POA, to protect the privacy of your husband's financial and other information. You might try something like, "I'm sorry but I have to protect our privacy. Why did you want to know? Perhaps I can give you general answers."

Try your best to convert the snoopers to helpers. "I'm so glad that you are taking an interest in your dad's health. I wonder if we could count on you to take him to lunch a couple times a month? He would enjoy some one-on-one time with you."

It depends on the nature of your relationship, but consider keeping them in the loop. Don't give the impression that they get to make decisions, but let them know what is going on and what your thinking is. This might be a weekly email update. "Hubby's hallucinations are diminishing, thank goodness! They still occur sometimes mid-afternoon. He seems most alert and lucid mid-day, so that is a good time for visits." Or "I am considering a day program a couple days a week, to give hubby some social interactions. You can read about it at their website ..." Help them to feel included rather than shut out. But firmly maintain the boundaries of what your role is.

Hang in there!
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It is an invasion of privacy. Your husband chose you to act for him. Plus, his financial affairs are your financial affairs. Your stepdaughter is sticking her nose into *your* business, where it has no business to be.

You at the same time recognise that it is natural for her to have questions about her father's overall wellbeing, which would include satisfying herself that his finances and care are being well managed. Of course.

So it's a question of deciding what information, and in what form, she can reasonably expect you to share, as opposed to where she is overstepping the mark.

Recognise her natural concerns but be frank and clear about what you are and are not going to share with her. 'What is it exactly that you feel you need to know?" might be a good opening question, and you can negotiate from there.

And, by the way, she has no right to 'insist' on anything: she can do you the courtesy of recognising that it is for you to decide what information is appropriate. That is where you can most certainly tap her on the shoulder and tell her to butt out.
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If you have legal POA plus you are married, you have the right to ask them to leave. You can also call 911 if they refuse. You may also wish to contact legal services to set up a chain of command in case you become ill or if they want to muscle their way into both of your finances. They are showing their true colors so protect yourselves
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I DO have legal POA, not only health but General and Durable as well....thank you for validating my own "take" on this!
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You are POA for a reason. Tell the girl to back-off. Your priority is your husband.
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Lili, I like the idea of locking financial records. Under the 'best' scenario, the daughters are wondering if they will be asked to contribute to their Dad's care. Under the worst, they are looking to an inheritance! In either case, they are being more than intrusive.
If records are online, change the passwords.
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lilikat111, you are right, you and your husband's financial information is none of their business. I would keep such documents in a locked file drawer.

MAC above had an excellent idea, see if hubby is still able to choose a second in line for his Power of Attorney. If you have a CPA, you can ask the CPA if he/she would be willing to do this [hourly rate would apply] or even the Elder Law Attorney [hourly rate would apply].

Heavens, I had no clue about my own parent's financial position until after my Mom had passed and Dad no longer wanted to fool with such paperwork, so then Dad's POA kicked in with me as the POA.
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Keep the lines of communication open. Share basic info if you feel comfortable doing so. They don't need all the details, but attempting to smooth rough relations now will save a lot of hassle later. You need to gain their trust.
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Can I ask how long have you been married to him and do 5he children help with the care of their father?
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I have a wife no. 2 and I'm a daughter and an only child., and she probably thought I was invasive, but she has given a lot of my dad's money away to her kids....buying them RVs, paying for apartments etc. My dad needs to go into a facility, but now she's spent the money. I cannot afford to quit my job to help. And because she's spent so much money, there won't be any to take care of her if my Dad goes first. So sometimes we daughters can be invasive for good reason.
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