My husband was non-responsive this morning when I found him asleep in his recliner with the nebulizer still on. Any advice?

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I called 911 but they would...The paramedics asked him some questions and he answered them correctly, and he stood up and was steady. They would not take him without his consent or with a court order. Later, he said he never heard me talk to him this morning. When he heard the paramedic talk to him, he sounded far off. He has an appointment with the heart doctor tomorrow and we will bring this up. He was sweaty, and struggling to breathe. He has c0pd and emphysema and has a defribilator/pacer in his chest.

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He turned out ok. He did have a defibrillator that jumped his heart back into proper action. We went to the heart doctor the next day and he is doing ok now. Thank you.
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Oh, after posting an answer I just realized this was an old post. What was the outcome of your husband?
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Before you go to the appointment, see if the pacer company rep can be there. They can interrogate the pacemaker and see what might have happened to him. But don't delay the doctor appointment. There are so many things that could have happened. Is he on prednisone? Did paramedics do a fingerstick glucose test on him? Low blood sugar will make one sweaty. The nebulizer usually speeds up the heart.... also, did he have pain? Sometimes people have a passing out episode (vaso/vagal reaction). He should have gone to the hospital.
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Google MOLST - a lot of states have authorized this form. It is similar to a DNR, but it is signed by a medical professional, and it is a medical order for life sustaining treatment (or not). It's printed on a bright pink paper so that emergency personnel can find it easily, and it is suggested that it be kept on the fridge or bedside at home or with the patient while on the road. The legal aspect is that it keeps EMT's from starting CPR if someone calls 911. You don't have to call 911 if you understand your loved one's wishes, usually expressed best in an Advanced Directive. The problem is if someone else disagrees with /does not know about the the AD and calls 911 when they see a person dying. MOLST will keep CPR from being started by the EMTs if that is the patient's wish, otherwise it is the legal duty of EMTs to try save the person in the absence of signed orders to the contrary.
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They can't force him to go if he refuses. Even if he had all the signs of a heart attack or stroke, the EMT's are all stop when he says no. If he wants a DNR then have him sign one, and you don't have to call 911 anymore.
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What a frightening experience for you! I hope the appointment goes well tomorrow.
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