My husband is just starting to wander out of the house. Any suggestions to stop him?

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urgh. "clothes"...for when he does wander. Chime on the gate (or electronic sensor like they have at stores). The bad news is that he might "get wise" to these sooner or later, the worse news is that of course after that he won't be able to figure them out. Reminded of story that caregiver told of former FBI agent who would sneak out the window to go to church.
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sensor that chimes alarm elsewhere in the house. labels in the close, hide his shoes at night. You could also take a walk every evening before dark (to get exercise) and maybe ask him why he is going out.
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You can check the 'net' for products to prevent wandering. They range from locks and alarms to ideas on 'disguising' the doorways! No experience to share though. Many of the wanderings are folks looking 'to go home'. For my Mom, it was the home of her youth that she was searching for. At 90, she had long ago moved from that residence. The night time was always the worst, a part of the sun downing. Between the wandering and the possibility of falls, it's a wonder any of the care givers get any rest at all, good luck
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As I understand it, wandering is fairly common in Alzheimer's Disease, but not necessarily in other forms of dementia. Jessie, I agree that it would be interesting to understand the compulsion behind it.

My husband did rehab in a "secure" TCU unit. The doors leading out all had some device high on the door that was easy for a guest to switch open and that automatically went back into place as the door closed. I laughed out loud when I saw it. Ain't no way that would have stopped my engineer husband if he had wanted to leave. (We had a family member with him at all times.) His roommate was also an engineer and also had a non-AD type of dementia. It wouldn't have stopped him, either.

I put a new lock on our basement door, to keep hubby from falling on the stairs and also to keep him away from power tools. His response? He got a screw driver and was taking the hinges off the door when I walked in on him one day. Sigh. You really have to know your loved one to figure out ways to keep them safe. What usually works with AD may not be successful with other types of dementia. It really depends on what brain functions are impaired.
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When mom started wandering, he put 2sliding locks on all the doors - including the door between the livingroom and kitchen. One lock way top and one way bottom.
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One thing you can do is put in a deadbolt that opens with a key on both sides, then keep the key with you. That way you could still get out fast if there was an emergency, but he wouldn't be able to get out without you knowing.

Some people do simpler things, such as have a sliding lock at the top of the door. I've heard some people with dementia have no problem figuring this out, though, so can still be out the door in no time. I have heard some people with dementia will go out a window if the door is locked. I hope that does not happen with your husband.

I wonder what it is about dementia that causes wandering. Are they looking for a place that seems familiar to them? Are they trying to go home? Wandering is such a mystery to me.
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plan B:
tire tool him in the kneecap a couple or three times..
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my mother is getting wacky enough to go check the mail multiple times a day. i dont want to discourage her from the good exercise but id like to know when she goes out so i rigged a micro switch to the front door and existing doorbell so i know when she goes out. she is quite prone to falls.
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