My husband keeps insisting that we need to leave our home because we can't afford it. Advice?

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I tell him that we can afford it. All our bills are paid. We get our social security checks and everything is fine. He still doesn't understand and won't let the subject rest. This goes on for about 2 hours periodically every week. Does anyone have any suggestions as to how I should handle this. I am so frustrated with him.

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My mom once got a bill in the mail she should not have gotten, decided she could not pay it, and moved herself out to the front door of her assisted living facility to wait for the bus to take her to the indigent care facility. I don't recall exactly how we convinced her everything was OK, but I made darn sure she did not get any more bills in the mail. I think I just gave her some explanation that the bill was incorrect, the expense was covered after all, and we were absolutely OK with the finances and I guess it worked. For heaven's sake, don't move out, LOL...
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Sandwich42plus, thank you. All of your suggestions are great and I will try this.
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With any dementia patient's topic of hyperfocus/obsession, all you can do is redirect. There is no logical proof you can offer that will get him over it. There is no activity that will "satisfy" this urge and make it go away for good. The bes you can hope for is temporary relief. This is a stage he is going through, and anything you choose to do about it is really for your benefit at that moment of that day.

If it will distract him for a while, it's a good thing. Whatever that is.
If it keeps him calm, it's a good thing.

You can say WHATEVER you need to say to him, to keep him calm.
It helps to get in their head and say whatever will be reassuring - 100% honest truth or not.
Some suggestions I have:

I'm waiting on some phone calls about this, honey. Then I'll know more.
I have to wait to talk to a realtor to help us. One step at a time.
I'm so lucky to have you looking out for us! It's going to be a couple weeks before I hear back from the realtor/lawyer/tax guy/etc.
The house insurance is paid up for the year, so we don't have to do anything until next year.
The realtor told me to stay put. This isn't the right market for us to move.
The realtor said there isn't anything in our price range right now and check back in 6 weeks.

Etc. This is a new communication skill nobody teaches us ahead of time. It feels weird at first, but you can learn to do it and maybe keep him less upset. Tell us how it's going!
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Thank you jeannegibbs. You understand my situation perfectly. My husband who has dementia doesn't understand our finances at all. We can afford our home but he thinks for some strange reason that we are poor and destitute. That is not the case. I have no intention of moving.
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Wow. I just cannot believe how many people are saying, in effect, "Listen to your demented husband's delusions about your finances and it might be better to do as he wants." What??

Mema is asking how she can deal with this obsession. I don't see her asking for advice about moving.

I think this is one of those cases where we have perfectly good answers we want to share, even if they aren't in response to the question asked.
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As stressful as downsizing and moving is, I sold my 40-yr residence last year (my husband had been gone for 10 years). Still have some stuff at my daughters' houses and my work; gradually selling things off on craig's list and ebay. My idea is that I'm better off doing this at an active 75 than later, with less energy and possibly poor health. At least now I know what things are and what their family history, if any, might be. My girls are actually using some "good" dishes that I rarely used and enjoying them--better than leaving them stashed. I would think that if the husband is wanting to move, take advantage of it, not waiting for an emergency situation..
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Maybe he had NO idea what other homes cost? Give him a real estate booklet (free every where ) and let him shop away..say you;ll go visit them soon. It may distract him. for awhile at least. We used to give my dad all those cruise/travel books that came and let him think we were going...later
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Twopupsmom: My thoughts exactly.
We have lived in our home for almost 40 yrs. and I wouldn't want to pack up either. When the time comes my husband will be the one moving to a NH.
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I am 70 and I could not fathom packing up everything in this house, downsizing and moving. 24/7 gets old, I don't have the time nor energy, just want hubby to be content, he will be 85 soon.
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I agree that it might be a good idea to consider some planning for his progression. Different people act in different ways, but if you will read about how many dementia patients progress, you'll see how very challenging it is to take care of a dementia patient in the home. It's not just forgetfulness. It's much more and it's a 24 hour job with no breaks. Even with help, it's very difficult and if he become wheelchair bound, perhaps impossible to handle it in the home without around the clock help.

I would take a look at some options, so at least you know what is available.
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