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Would it be safe for him to be dropped at a service organization to watch football twice a week and pick him up when game is over? There is a bar, he would want to have a beer, not sure any alcoholic drink (even one) would be advisable since he's on ativan, zoloft and aricept. Could he be trusted leaving him there if the members and employees were told he cannot leave until approved driver picks him up? He must depend on a walker, not very steady on his feet due to previous surgeries on hip (twice in 2 weeks, and knee replacement). Would it be better if a trusted person pick him up at AL and went with him, stayed and brought him home? Or would it be too much responsibility on the driver, acquaintance, friend?

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My mom has dementia, I take her to church once a week and leave her. She hasn't wonder off. I feel safe doing it.
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sounds like a VFW hall to me too. i think as long as has someone with him the whole time for safety, that it would be a delightful break for him! as to the alcohol, i'd ask the doctor.

i'm on two anti seizure meds and one tricyclic antidepressant; as long as i don't drink with or close to the medication, i don't suffer any ill effects. i never have more than a beer, a cider or two. but everyone is different and responds differently. doctors and pharmacists can best answer the question.
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All of the above suggestions are wonderful. Can you consider beer of the non alcoholic type? I would not let LO go alone to an event.
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Would this be like at a VFW hall or Rotary club, Masonic temple kind of place? If so, I'd contact whomevers are officers to discuss with them in advance what their thoughts are on dad's visits. Personally, I think it's a great idea but the organization might be concerned about their liability if anything should happen. My uncle Willie was quite involved with Knights of Columbus and went to meetings and social stuff in his council to just about the last 6 -8 months when his ALZ was end stage. He thought the hat they wear was a bird or some sort of pet, quite amusing. One couple basically adopted him for all events he went to and took him back & forth from his memory care unit with them so either they or his daughter was always there when he went on outside field trips. I'd ask about to see if someone wants to volunteer to do this for him otherwise I'd go with him and stay doing my own thing (iPad time) while he watches the game and has a brew. Could be fun too. Keep a sense of humor as it's likely if you are female and this is a mens organization, that one of the old roosters is going to hit on you.....really.
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It would not be advisable to leave him without a responsible person willing to stay with him. It can be done in a manner that allows him to feel that the person is there as a friend to watch and enjoy the game with him.
If he has been advised by S.W,, Physicians and Nursing staff to be placed in an AL with supervision then that tells me that he may be at risk being left alone.
The medication is also indicative of what is prescribed for an individual suffering from a Dementia related disorder such as Alzheimer's. Alcohol would not be a good mix.
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Hi. It is so difficult to know how much freedom he will be able to handle, yet freedom is so essential to the human nature. I suspect you could use the break, too. Is there someone who could step in once he is there? Safety nets are essential.

My spouse is now in a nursing home. He is on the exact same meds as your spouse and has a physician's order for up to two alcoholic beverages per day. I take the bottle to the home and they keep it in a freezer at the nurses' station.
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Until you know for sure what he is like at these events, I think someone should go with him, stay for the event, and bring him home.

As for having a beer, talk to his doctor. My husband, LBD, is on a ton of meds and I was surprised when both his neurologist and his geriatrician approve alcohol, no more than 2 drinks a day. People with dementia lose so much and have to give up so much, it is a pity to deprive them of a small pleasure unless it really makes a difference. My husband seldom finishes a whole bottle of beer, but he enjoys the idea that he can have one if he wants it.
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If someone is willing to take responsibility for him, then I say go for it. It would have to be someone that would also be willing to stay with him or at least near him the whole time.
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