Husband needs help getting out of his wheelchair. Any suggestions?

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My husband, except for being able (sometimes) to pull himself up on his walker to a wobbly stand. We've engaged the services of our local Provide-a-Ride with a wheelchair lift and finally made it to the doctor's, but once again, after sitting in the wheelchair for about 4 hours (we waited an hour for the van to come back to pick him up), he was unable to get up out of the chair and we had to call our son for help. Does anyone know of a device we can purchase that would raise him up like a regular lift chair/recliner would? I am hesitant to call 911 each time we go out, especially since it's not a medical emergency. Also, to bring a home health aide, even if we had one, wouldn't be worth their time. Perhaps a solid, high, chair pad? Any suggestions? Thanks.

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Sunny girl, thanks for your advice. At this point, since my mom passed last month, I am "only" responsible for my husband's care. You have echoed my ideal case scenario, have him admitted to a hospital or rehab, undergo all the testing and perhaps stay for some intensive PT and OT. That way, our transportation issues would be solved. But once again, I'm not sure insurance would cover him being admitted just for tests. I suppose the best one to answer that would be Medicare and his supplemental insurance people. Thanks again!
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Hugemom, your profile reports that you have a family full of people that you are caregiving for. I'd be careful of lifting and pulling on someone who is not mobile. If you hurt your back or shoulder, who will help the others?

Is there a chance that your husband will recover his leg strength so that he can transfer easily? Can he stay at a rehab facility while he undergoes testing and recovery?

Have you inquired from his insurance if they will cover the transporting? Does he qualify for Medicaid? I'd explore all options. While I'm sure that others may want to help you, I hesitate to ask people to help lift people or anything really, because, if they injure themselves and can't work, I'll feel it was on me. To me, that is for people who are employed to do that job, get paid for it and are covered by insurance if something goes wrong.
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He can try a few exercises without having to call in a physical therapist, eldergym is a great website for ideas. A couple my mom's PT had her doing back when she could still stand/walk:
-march in place while holding the counter or walker... put a chair behind him in case he gets tired
-then squats while holding on to supports... only an inch or two down and up
-lift the knees high in a marching step while walking slowly ... you may want to follow with the wheelchair
There were other seated exercises too. It is surprising how helpful even a few reps every day can be!
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Thank you for your answers. My husband does have a walker, but even though I sit on it (and I am no "weakling" 🙂) his arm strength is not enough to pull himself up. He has better luck getting out of his Geri-chair, which is a bit higher, but that is not for transporting him out of doors. I'm not certain whether he had problems because of the long wait for the van pickup, but since we are at the mercy of the van's schedule, there's little we can do. Medical transport is cost-prohibitive and is not covered by insurance. We do have an MRI scheduled for next week--his second round as the first one was inconclusive 5 years ago. Before we would continue with physical and/or occupational therapy, we need a better idea of what's going on. I just know I cannot keep pestering my son for help or calling 911. Sorry. Feeling a little help/hopeless right now.
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Would it help if he had a walker in front of him to give him a way to push up? It might be too high though.
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Do you know what is causing this weakness with your husband's legs? I agree that PT would be something to explore. Being able to transfer is so crucial. If he can't transfer, it will mean so many more obstacles to overcome with his care and travel.

I don't have any information about the other devices you mentioned. They may help, but, would be an additional expense that may or may not be covered. Also, I'd be concerned with lifting him up, yet his legs still be weak and him sliding to the floor, due to not being able to support his weight if the device lifts him too high.
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My first suggestion would be some PT, because his ability to stand and transfer is so important in getting him out of bed and off the toilet as well ans rising from his wheelchair.
There are lift devices that are potable and do not require electricity, Upeasy Booster Lift is one I found on youtube after a quick search, but I have seen others.
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