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Husband hears a voice telling him to do opposite. Like - not to go in the toilet but somewhere else.

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Thank you, mrranch2. We've talked to the doctor who put Hubby on the meds. I will be more supportive in the worlds you both live in. Yes, some of the hallucinations have been entertaining, to say the least!
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I have FTD and LBD. I have both audio and visual hallucinations. My wife subscribed to a security agency for me (I tend toward paranoia). She travels in her job, frequently overnight. I have a dachsund care partner. I rely on the two of them to tell me whether or not it is me or do we really have something going on.

The visual hallucinations are most frequently and generally related to shadows--sometimes animals (a small furry white dog used to run from room to room across the hall), but usually people (we live in west Texas; one night recently I saw a large bear in the corner of our back yard--no bears in our neck of the woods). There have been times I have seen people (male) enter the room, then just disappear when I look directly at them, and for several weeks I had a British Revolutionary War soldier, red coat, blue pants, white shirt with laced collar, cocked hat, hands but no face or feet, for a 'friend' who visited regularly. They never say anything. I usually find the visual interesting and sometime entertaining (my neuro once said I need to take out a subscription).

The audio are generally annoying--like someone trying to carry on a conversation when I'm trying to do something else. I can only describe them as generally like 'talk radio', occasionally with some music, or the tv being on but turned down low in the next room--in other words, I usually can't really tell you what is being said or what I'm hearing. There are usually two men speaking, sometimes a woman is included. Once in awhile the woman only speaks, or a woman and a man. Sometimes they are arguing, though usually it's more like a conversation. They have never been distinct enough for me to say they actually are telling me to do anything.

There have been a few times things have been more than annoying. One night recently I woke up to voices (not unusual), but these were sufficiently loud to keep me awake (I sometimes put my fingers in my ears and if I still hear the voices I know it is me--this time it was me). Then I began to see things moving in the shadows (imagination?). My wife was out of town, but our dachsund was in bed with me and didn't respond so I knew for sure it was me, but I got up to check out the house anyway. I took an extra Xanax and went back to sleep.
More recently was a similar occurrence: I awoke to all three voices arguing. Again I saw movement in the shadows and I heard sounds like someone walking in the house. My wife and our dog were sound asleep so I knew it was me. I quietly got up, searched the house and felt compelled to leave--not to get away from whatever was going on in the house, but to get away from the voices. I finally took another Xanax and went back to bed.
A few days ago the three voices woke me again, also arguing, and there was movement in the shadows. I determined it was caused by noise from the wind blowing, turned over and went back to sleep.

Interestingly, a few months ago I was hospitalized for a UTI and sepsis (WBC were off the chart), but my hallucinations neither increased nor decreased, though several other things (balance, walking, general motor control, memory, orientation, etc.) were effected.

I guess my point is, at this stage (5 years) of my journey I am still able to recognize what is real and what is not, and when in doubt to rely on my wife and little care partner to tell me (though the dog is very afraid of the sounds west Texas wind makes and can be somewhat unreliable at times). I regularly discuss these episodes with my doctor; he recently added seroquel to my pharmacy stock, in part because of the more terrifying experiences, all of which occurred since Thanksgiving, and a few other symptoms of concern that have begun.

Talk to the doctor.

If the hallucinations create a dangerous situation provide the appropriate level of supervision to ensure safety, including calling 911 if need be.

Hallucinations are defined as false sensory input--vision, hearing, feeling, tasting, smelling (in that general order of frequency). DON'T ARGUE--hallucinations are the patient's reality and you'll never convince us we don't see or hear what we do (I may be aware I'm hallucinating, but to me it is real and I may act out in defense or simply trying to get it to stop--like when I felt compelled to leave to get away from the voices).

Be supportive. Redirect us to something we really enjoy (like favorite music, or activity, or both), rather than trying to draw us into your world, where your reality is.

Try to get into our world (ask questions about what we see or hear, feel, smell or taste, as you would if we were both standing on one side of the Grand Canyon and I was pointing out something on the other side but you couldn't really see it). Who knows? You may find my hallucinations equally interesting or entertaining!!!
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I'mmmm back. Regarding the voices. Neurologist put him on Risperdone 0.25 mg (Risperdal) about 3 weeks ago. (He's still hearing them & we are due for a checkup next week). My question is this: Should we talk about what he "heard" the next morning? Or, just say, "forget it. That was last night. Your voices are gone" or something to that effect?
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Cheyenne: Let us know how it goes! Hope all is well with you both!
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He needs to be evaluated, voices telling him to do the opposite doesn't sound right. I'm hoping it goes well for you.
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Will call neurologist tomorrow. Thank you, all!
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Definitely get him evaluated, and if the MD says inpatient evaluation, do not delay in getting him admitted. What if the voices tell him he is in danger and he should cut your throat ? Take no chances.
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Are these audio hallucinations new? The doctor who is following his dementia should definitely hear about this development.

Visual hallucinations are more common, and the advice there is not to dispute that the person sees what he says he sees, to calm him and reassure him that he is safe (if that is appropriate), and redirect the conversation to another topic.

I wonder if that could be applied to these hallucinations as well? "The voice says you should do xyz a different way? That is very interesting. Thank you for telling me. Can we talk about this when we get up tomorrow? I think we both need sleep now." or "Hmm. That is an unusual place to pee. Who is telling you this? Do you have any idea why they are giving you this odd advice? ... Well, you and I have known each other much longer than this voice has been talking to you. I hope that you can trust me and just tell the voice that you will continue peeing where your wife thinks you should. ... I'm going to start dinner now. Can you keep me company in the kitchen?"

Let us know what the doctor says, and how this works out. We care. And we learn from each other.
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Perhaps any other thoughts? Along with the good answer of ba8alou.
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Ok , ba8alou. Will do tomorrow, today being Sunday.
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The fact that he didn't have a uti last week doesn't mean he doesn't have one today. That being said, a change in mental status, even in a dementia patient, should be reported to his geriatric doc or neurologist asap. There are meds that can help with this.
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Doesn't have any infection. We were at urologist last week & got a clean bill of health. I need help in the area of the person having dementia hearing voices in his head telling him to do things. He woke me up about 2 am to tell me that this voice told him to do a regular routine differently.
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Please have him checked for a urinary tract infection, asap. I would consider a trip to the ER.
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