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This has happened on previous occasions. and he is 83 and I know his legs are weak. So, I am wondering what is going to happen when he no longer can depend on his legs anymore. Is he bedridden, wheelchair bound, do we need to rely on assisted living? All those questions come up. So, if anyone can help me with this line of thinking I would greatly appreciate it. He was ok after the fall. He was able to get up. Nothing got anything but bruises-arm and hand.

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I also agree with PT of course depending what they say and what else is wrong. Yes, walkers are great to use, what about a scooter or wheel chair for long distances? I believe if he still has the strength to help at least move from a wheelchair to bed or wheelchair to a chair, you can handle it. It depends on you as well and getting a little extra help would be good for you. Let the Drs know and see what they say. Good luck and let us know how he is doing.
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I also was wondering why his legs aren't "able to do pt to gain strength." I apologize for being blunt, but is he paralyzed or are there some other issues with his legs? And is this a doctor's conclusion?

PT works wonders.
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You say: " his legs are not able to do PT to gain strength." Was an actual physical therapy evaluation ever done ? The purpose of physical therapy is to take weak muscles and strengthen them.
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Thanks, for answering. I told him to use a walker because it will help alot. His legs are not able to do pt to gain strength. So, I am looking at being a caregiver in a different way. We can still get out and go to the doctor. Or get out and go places, just not as much.
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Wish we could edit our posts. Meant to say, your husband will probably spend his days on a sofa, in a recliner, etc. He won't be limited to just sitting in a wheelchair or staying in bed as long as you or his caregiver are able to help move him back and forth.
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First of all a visit to the doctor is in order for an evaluation. The doctor may suggested in home physical therapy, from that you learn if his legs can be strengthened. Using a walker is much more stable than a cane.

Once he can no longer use his legs, he will probably spend his days in a wheelchair. Mother could not use her arms to move a wheelchair because they are so heavy. We used what they call a transporter chair. Lightweight and easy to get in and out of the car.

To me, moving to nursing home/assisted living (whatever), comes when the care your love one needs can no longer be provided at home.

Best of luck!
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Regarding eyeglasses, my parents' eye doctor said that people who are older and wear bifocals or trifocals tend to trip over things because they are looking through the *reading* part of the eyeglasses when walking or going up or down stairs.... instead of putting their head down to look through the other more clearer lens of their glasses.

I notice that with my significant other who wear bifocals, he occasionally is stepping on a cat toy he didn't see on the rug.
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Ask his primary care or orthopaedic physician for a script for PT. If he can get out to go to a facility, so much the better as he'll have access to aerobic and resistance equipment that wouldn't be available in the home.

Also ask his therapist what exercises he can do at home. He'll need to work on leg and arm strengthening - legs for the obvious reason and arms to assist him in safely lifting himself from a seated position.

In the house, clear out fall and trip hazards - throw rugs, "stuff" along the walking paths, etc. Add grab bars in areas where there aren't hand holds such as furniture that he can grab or sit in if he loses his balance.

Add grab bars outside the entrance doors as well. If you don't have rails, and can afford to add them to exit paths and steps, do so.

My father uses a small cycle, similar to the ones used in rehab facilities. It's like a bicycle but only has the pedal part. He exercises to strengthen his legs while sitting in a chair.

If you can get him outside to go for walks, so much the better. But you might ask a therapist how to use a gait belt for walks so that you can hold him if he begins to lose his balance.

It's best to address stability and balance now so hopefully you won't have to deal with the issue of his not being able to use his legs anymore.

A neurologist who spoke at an AAA Expo said that eyesight, hearing and balance all affect falls. So make sure that his glasses are current (if he wears them) and that he has a hearing aid if needed.
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Fancicoffee7, I would suggest your husband start using a cane. My Dad had issues with falling, but now with the use of a cane, the falls aren't that frequent. Just make sure the cane is correctly fitted for him so he's not slouching over to one side.

Curious, are you still living in your home or at a retirement village? If you are still living at home, you might consider a retirement village if you can find one within your income means.... that way, if your husband goes from a cane to a walker, he can still feel independent in a retirement village and enjoy everything it has to offer. And, of course, these villages have skilled workers/security who know how to pick someone up if you find you can't. Plus these villages have gyms and physical therapists that can help.
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I could be wrong, but I think when the time comes for a care center it won't be Assisted Living -- it would be a nursing home.

Did he fall trying to get from the bed to the wheelchair or the wheelchair to the toilet (or the revers) or was he just walking about?

See if his doctor will order a physical therapist to come to your home and work with him on retaining enough leg strength to do transfers. Are you able to help him with transfers? Is it practical to insist he not get up without assistance?

Be very careful of your own back when assisting him. Have the PT show you the best ways to assist him, and also keep the number of your local fire station handy, if they provide the service of helping people get up from a fall.
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Is he willing to use a walker? I hope he has been checked out by the doctor after he's fallen. Sometimes there could be an injury you don't see. (My father has fallen several times). Has he been diagnosed with something that is causing his weakness?
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