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He will argue with his image and becomes afraid of him. Is this normal as the disease progress? I have removed mirrors, except the one in the bathroom and he is hesitant to use the bathroom and take a shower in there because the man will hurt him.

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This is very common with AD. Your husband, in his mind, is a much younger man so that man is a stranger. He may become frightened by the "intruder."

One common suggestion for AD caregivers is to remove or cover mirrors. I know - it's hard. But when you "get into his head" - well, think of how you'd react if you walked into a room and saw a stranger standing there!

One more devastating aspect of AD that is far, far too common.
Take care of yourself any way that you can,
Carol
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Oh my gosh how awful and frustrating for your husband and YOU! Can you cut down an old sheet that will fit specifically the bathroom mirror, and just keep it in the bathroom? You could affix velcro to both the wall surrounding the mirror and the sheet itself, then putting it up before he takes a shower wouldn't be that big of a problem. You Sure don't want to discourage him from taking showers, then you'll have a whole different issue! ♥
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I had to cover a very large mirror in the bathroom with a klight weight plastic table cloth, used painters tape to secure. Have had to take down all mirrors he could see. . It is difficult to get him to take a shower as it is without seeing people in the mirror.
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My husband went through the same thing. Somehow he even etched the glass in my antique dining room mirror. I covered every mirror and he then stopped. He is over that now and is in late stage dementia. They seem to go through spells of different things!
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This is a symptom of late stage dementia when one does not recognize their own face in a mirror. Don't sweat about it. Just cover the mirrors.
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You might check "decorative privacy window film" on Amazon. It' s static cling to put on windows for privacy - you cut to fit. This might work for you on a mirror! It's not easy to peel off, but does come off when you want to remove it. I've used on a bathroom window, as well as on the bottom of a 1st floor window where I just wanted a bit more privacy but didn't want to cut off too much light.

There are LOTS of designs and levels of privacy, so I'd think you could find one that would work for you. (And I'd also think that this would be a relatively easy fix - as well as easy to undo.)
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I remember reading that people with dementia at any stage get very confused when looking in a mirror because they don't recognize themselves at this stage of life. If you put a picture of your husband up when he was younger then it might help him to go in the bathroom. My mom had a HORRIBLE time taking a shower when I first took her to the facility. She would fight the attendants and it was terrible. Now she is far enough along that she is wheelchair bound and or bedridden and it's not a problem. They think of themselves as young instead of that old person in the mirror (heck I do too when I look at myself:) (have to keep my sense of humor somehow). Anyway, try to put up a picture of him when he was younger or like posted above, take the mirrors down. Oh, it's also normal for them to fight a shower because they either don't understand what is going to happen in that tiny space plus water hitting them, they think they already have (as in my mother's case when she hadn't showered in a week or so) or it's just something else they are being told to do, at what time and where and how to do it. Don't know how I will react when someone tells me what to do all the time. Good luck and God Bless
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On the other side, my Brother's MIL found a new friend. They went to see her and she was telling them about her new neighbor and what a lovely person she was. She said, let me introduce her to you. She went into the bedroom where the mirrored closet doors were and proceeded to have a wonderful conversation with the person in the "apt. next door".
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Some care homes I have visited use a picture of the client that they recognise as being them (and that can vary depending on what time space they are in) and put that where the mirror used to be. It isn't always successful but it works for some people and does stop a lot of the distress for those people.
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PS - Another idea would be to spray the mirror with "frosted window glass" spray. You can later remove with a razor blade. :)
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