My husband had called 911. I can't shut off the phones. Suggestions?

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I got home from the dentist and found a police car at the house. I left my husband watching the Yankee game. I went to the dentist and I left a message to that effect on a small white board, as usual. Apparently, he called the police saying he was watching the game and someone got hit in the head. I'm not sure exactly what he said. The police thought he may have done something to me. When I got home shortly thereafter, the officer had a handle on the situation. He suggested I get an alarm for the door and a bracelet for my husband. All well and good, but that doesn't stop him from using the phone. I can't shut down our phone service. The phone is the one thing he remembers how to use and uses it often. He has tried to call Clint Eastwood, The White House, Donald Trump..... Should I just wait until he forgets how to use the phone, just like the computer, the TV remote, the microwave, et al.? Any suggestions?

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I think in some cases can make it where a code is needed for everything but 911 ect. might want to ask phone company about that
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For the last two years i have watched my mom and step dad go through this together. I had to remove things from around my step dad, but the only thing that was hard for me i had to stop her from cooking, she would put something on the stove and they both would go to sleep and if i was cooking dinner and had to run out to the store for something i forgot for dinner he would go into the kitchen and turn up the stove and dinner would get ruined and they didn't remember who did it. I disconnected the stove and started cooking on a stove top burner once i finished cooking i would lock up the burner with other things i felt would endanger them. Besides if i would say something to him it would always angry him, so i just started putting away things to stop things from repeating itself, because his couldn't remember things for five minutes that he had did or said to anyone.
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Philis, keep calm.
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Philis, look at our posts, about the same time. Your first one was there when I posted, but as I was typing a response your second post must have been about the same time. Look at the time stamps.
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" have you ever tried an agency caregiver? You did not read my post at all.

" Cash under the table? DAM RIGHT

" but it sounds like it isn't working thus far." Working WAY better then the years I used agencies and got rid of just as many people. Ummmm duh, every one of them has college or university PSW certificate or higher.
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I am currently using a nationwide caregiver agency, and since this was a last minute request for 24 hour basic care, the agency sent those who do fill ins until a regular can be found. I found the employees to be super, watchful, attentive, asking please let me do something to help. Even the fellow they sent wanted to do laundry, vacuum, dust... he wanted to be kept busy.

But my Mom [97 and clear mind] had other ideas, she didn't want the employees in her house.... oops, we have a problem in the room, and her name is Mom. Dad on the other hand was so happy to have so many new sets of ears to listen to his stories. Both my parents are fall risks, but Mom said she didn't want help. So today I cut back the 24 hour watch to just day time watch... and will get one of those alert thingees for Dad to wear... just hope he doesn't lose it :P

What I liked about an agency is that the Caregivers are licensed, bonded, insured, and the company pays them Workmans Comp if injured... and if a caregiver can't make it, they send out a replacement for that shift.
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Philis, have you ever tried an agency caregiver? Many are trained. If the caregivers you use are not trained what they find may be a complete shock that they are not able to deal with. Cash under the table? All it would takeis one of these caregivers to call the IRS and you will have many more problems, not related to dementia. Have you ever received a recommendation for a caregiver you have used? I know it saves lots of money to hire privately, pay cash, but it sounds like it isn't working thus far.
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I guess I was very lucky. The very first CPA the agency send was an awesome fit. I kept her through hospice, even though many days her services were less needed. I think of her from time to time, and hope she is doing well on her assignments now.
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If you hire an agency I warn you right now you will have almost no options in terms of changing people as they will only have maybe 3 people at most they will switch out before they turn on you, hiring privately is the ONLY way I advise you to go, it is the ONLY way to control what type of people will come, and believe me paying more and going with agencies will NOT give you better people, I was doing it for 3 years before saying NO WAY EVER AGAIN to agencies.
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About caregivers I will warn you it may take going through 30 before you find one that will be decent, the field is full of arrogant jezebels. I have literally gone through probably 150 in the last 5 years, probably more. None of them ever last more then 2-3 months if that, most (95%) don't even last 1 week, I hire all privately and pay in cash.
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