Husband (84) with Alzheimer's has started sleeping more. Any advice?

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He goes to sleep at 9 pm and does not get up until 1-3pm on the afternoon, I check every hour he says he just very tired. He has no other major illness and meds have remained the same for over two years now.

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I agree with you, Leakey, but twopupsmom, Hubby does have thoughts and works at them every day via paper work he's saved from the past. I think that Hubby's body is just starting to shut down. Days, weeks, years to go? Just one day at a time. One nap at a time.
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Thank you Leaky I believe the same my husband hates that he has no thoughts
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My wife sleeps a lot but it seems to be a comfort zone for her rather than face life as it is so sad
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I agree with Paradise. They apparently need more sleep as the disease progresses. In the early stages, I might try lots of things to regulate day and night and provide meaningful activity. But in the later stages, I don't see sleep as an enemy. If/when the sleep takes up 20 hours a day, if might be time for a hospice evaluation.

twopupsmom, this is the 9th year for you. I think more sleeping sounds "normal" under the circumstances. Do mention it at your next doctor's appointment, but I don't personally think this is "urgent" and needs immediate attention, nor do I think you need do anything about it.

(Note to those whose loved ones are in earlier stages: one answer does not fit all circumstances. For sleep problems in the earlier stages I have a whole different answer!)
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Let him sleep...you have to pick your battles....the toll of agitation on both of you is worse than a little extra sleep. I would pick a time to make sure he eats but if he wants to go back to bed, let him. I have a client who I make sure she gets breakfast & she'll go back to bed..15 min later, she'll be back out thinking it's the first time she's been up. They need more sleep as the disease progresses.
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I have joined Compassion and Choices. Little by little they are opening the eyes and ears of those they serve.
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That is a bit excessive, but if she's tired AND ill that's the reason.
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I have been a caregiver to my mother and to my husband, both of whom suffered from Alzheimer's. I am 84, functioning well, and hope my children never have to deal with me in that situation.
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For caregivers who have written about their own wishes if they have dementia: The web site Compassion and Choices gives information that those of us who are still competent to write an advanced directive to express our wishes for our own lives. The web site states, "The following language can be added to any Advance Directive or Living Will. There it will serve to advise physicians and family of the wishes of a patient with Alzheimer's Disease or other form of dementia. You may simply sign and date this form and include it with the form My Particular Wishes in your Advance Directive."
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I agree waking them at 7am to start a scheduled day, scheduled for what? I have been through (9th year) the all day ranting and ravings wanting to leave, I am simply wanting to give my husband rest and solitude. He has all his blood work done every 3 months, all that was mentioned is fine. He wakes smiling with no aggression - what more can I ask for. I hated watching him go all day long into his chamber of horrors. I will not do that to him again. If he chooses to sleep so be it, I am still here and am the first thing he sees when waking & that makes him smile. Finished I'm with you I just hope I know soon enough that I may have AD I could not be so brave as you to take to a gun but hopefully find a companionate DR to help. No one should have to live through this, ever.
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