How variable are moods, memory and confusion with dementia?

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I understand the mood/cognitive changes that can occur with sundowner's, but is it typical for someone to have absolutely clear thinking and most memory, without confusion, and then other days being moody or confused and difficulty or inability to remember anything? This is how my 93-year old mom acts and although I celebrate (with relief) the good days, it is at times difficult to figure out what's happening on the other days.

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Don't need to have thyroid tested as it is usually in regular lab work, More so to test if there is already a thyroid diagnosis and already on meds. As far as UTI's, prevention is best. My MIl cannot properly clean after incontinance. She keeps reinfecting as the culture is usually ecoli. We give her cranberry juice 3x's day. Cranberry juice naturally kills the bacteria found in UTI's. The anesthsia she had for hip can worsen the dementai as well. Tell her to use her walker when she gets up. It has prevented many falls for my MIL. keep her moving
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Thank you for your responses! Should I ask the PCP to test thyroid levels? But I see what you say about changes in routine/overload and with infection--Mom has had several UTI's, it's a really big problem because she weakens physically as well as being unable to express how she's feeling.

This past weekend, she had a full day of promising she wouldn't get up (still recuperating from a partial hip replacement and not always steady), then 5 minutes later getting up to straightening something, go into laundry room--and it happened over and over when I couldn't stay in the room. What she says just disappears. THE NEXT DAY, she was bright, patient, and didn't feel the need to continually get up, and seemed to remember what she'd said.

My brother called that evening, and after I talked about mom getting up, and not being able to stay in the same room with her all the time (or pay for a caretaker), and her confusion, she did just what Marialake said, spoke so clearly (and making up the experiences she didn't remember or didn't happen) that I'm sure my brother believes things aren't anywhere as hard as I talk about! Most elderly, (dementia or not), will "rise to the occasion" if they want to impress others and not feel things aren't what they once were--no one can blame them, but it sure is frustrating.
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You are right. It if often feels like they "make a liar out of you."
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Fatigue, infection, sensory overload, and change of routine can cause changes. One biggie causing memory change or forming words is if thyroid medication is not within therapeutic range. But you are right! My mother in law has better days than others. I agree with you... celebrate the good days.
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