How can I tell if mom's bruises are from abuse?

Follow
Share

My mother has dementia and cannot remember what happened two minutes ago...she is at home with 24 hour care (4 shifts). She bruises very easy. My mother bruises and gets those purple marks on her arms. Can anyone tell me if those purple blood marks would appear on the face.. My mother now has what I would consider a black and blue mark under her eye that is suspicious but looks like the marks she gets on her arms very frequently. It's a little black and blue underneath...Any thoughts ? It was brought my attention but obviously no one is saying she fell, etc...I want to to know if it's her think skin or abuse? I just never saw the purple on her face..always her arms. Any thoughts??? Anyone familiar with those purple blood marks on seniors with very thin skin? I don't want to accuse anyone..

This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Find Care & Housing
32

Answers

Show:
I'd tread carefully, especially since she bruises easily and that isn't unusual, however, you need to be very aware. It's even possible - just possible - the bruises are suspicious. Not likely, though.
This kind of thing is tough. If she had only one caregiver, I'd be more worried. Since she has so many, there's a kind of checks and balances. Still, keep an eye open. Can you stop in unannounced from time to time? Is there a neighbor who can stop over "just to visit?"

You are right in not making accusations without grounds, but you are also right in being on alert. Watch carefully for anything suspicious.
Carol
Helpful Answer (2)
Report

You should absolutely be concerned, you are her only line of defense if there is abuse happening. Of course, it may not be abuse but this is where a "Granny Cam" might come in handy.
Helpful Answer (4)
Report

In addition, I suggest asking her doctor. Maybe some of her medicines make her more susceptible to bruises.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

People who bruise really easily can give themselves dark shadows under an eye just by rubbing the eye. I hate to put it this way but if she bruises that easily and she IS being abused, you'll see more obvious marks soon. It's the SECOND suspicious mark that would worry me. Keep a log of everything, so you can watch for patterns and not rely on your memory.
Helpful Answer (3)
Report

I would try to contact the agency that sends the care giver to your Mom and discuss matters, If no results-there are senior agencies, that may be of help to you. I also would be inclined to get to the bottom of this matter.
Best,
Hap
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

It is good you suspect everything. If you can, try and sit with your mom alone, and ask her about if anyone hits her. Other than that, you should let her internist know. Sometimes Leukemia patients have black and blue marks. My mom has CLL and I think her condition is worsening due to more black and blues. Get a blood test. You could always get a concealed device (camera hidden in a clock off the internet) , or put cameras in the rooms to tape what is happening. Even if you just tell the caregivers you have put in cameras(but you don't activate anything) you can then assess if the black and blue marks disappear. That would mean they have stopped abusing her. I still would get mom to the doctor.
-Hw
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

brusing is an easy thing in elderly people, I care for my mon, and she is brusing all the time , falls, bumping herself on furniture,wheelchair, I am concerned when one happens, and if I would be accused of abuse to her, if she went to dr. I keep a dailey manual , documenting all falls, bruses, skin abraisions, also tell the other 2 caregivers when any thing happens, as they do me. you could have a short meeting with all your caregivers, state your concerns, ask them to document, and share any happenings that might produce a bruse, lol firstgirl
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

My 93 year old Mother was in a care home and fell out of bed a few times. She had a mark on her jaw from hitting the nightstand, but it was red. Does your Mother wear glasses? She could have bumped herself. I think it is confusing to ask a question of them--just as with small children--that could put words or thoughts in their mouth. When they are so confused, it's so hard to know what's really happening. Since Mother has been with us, she has not fallen, but occasionally has small marks on her arms and hands when she bumps herself on the table. Try to pay attention to the condition of most residents when you visit: if you see lots of similar facial marks, it could be a problem. If not, most likely it can be explained. Bless her:)
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

Hello, 1st, you must trust your own instincts at all times.Try to establish a system of checks or install a camera. Tell the staff that there ARE cameras since your Mom cannot give information.You are her eyes and ears and mouth. You must protect her as you would a helpless infant .Observe your Moms subtle responses to each caretaker.Talk to her ALONE, in simple terms,ask if she's ok, is she safe and happy.rather than asking her to struggle to remember.See what reaction you get. I don't know what her communication level is, but try. You've got to be able to trust your helpers.Your task is hard enough without the lingering fear and uncertainty. Yes, elderly people can have very thin and fragile skin that bruises easily, especially if they are taking any so called "blood thinners":aspirin,coumadin, etc and also because they are very prone to dehydration. The dark spots you see are small bleeds under the skin,and can occur really anywhere on the body.However ! This is something your Mom's MD should be made aware of and you can also have an RN or an MD evaluate the mark on her face as well as the others. The facial bruising does sound a bit unusual. Thank God you are so attentive to your Mom and Love her enough to be concerned. Do both of you a favor now and call asibling or friend to be with you and call the MD and set up an appt. I wouldn't leave Mom alone with anyone until this is resolved. I SINCERELY hope that this is not a case of abuse.I 'll say a prayer for you tonight.God Bless and hang in there.D
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

It's been my experience that paid caregivers are almost all very caring and sensitive people. That bruising can be caused by ruptured blood vessels under the skin, vessels that break in the elderly at the slightest excuse. Unless one of the caregivers gives you the creeps, I would lean toward believing that a single "suspicious" mark like that might have a dozen innocent causes. My wife gets bruises on her arms, hips and rib cage from straining while transferring into and out of her wheelchair. After a while, her doctor quit hinting that the bruises were "suspicious" and accepted that they just happen. Old people are fragile. Unless new bruises shaped like fingers or fist imprints start showing up, I'd give mom's care facility the benefit of the doubt.
Helpful Answer (1)
Report

See All Answers
This question has been closed for answers. Ask a New Question.
Related
Questions