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How to tell if Dad is hung over or having a stroke?

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DO NOT WAIT FOR STROKES! TIME IS URGENT.
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I was also wondering how much he drank ( and where?) that the hangover issue was even there... BUT... we recently had a case here in our state where an elderly woman fell down the stairs, her family she lived with brought her in to a hospital. Turns out she had drank 10 beers before the fall. Heck if I had 10 beers I would be comatose for days! Seems this was comman behavior in the family... so may not be a prankster, just someone with a different lifestyle.
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If he smells like booze, it's a hangover.
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I'm not falling for it.. Move on......
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How is he drinking? If he doesn't have access to alcohol, how can he be hungover? Dementia presents with many symptoms, and you need to learn them in order to care for him. Get him to a doctor to accurately evaluate his condition unless he is not breathing, call 911.
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If you are concerned about hangovers to this degree, I am going to guess your father may not have been correctly diagnosed. It is easy for doctors to miss the diagnosis of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome because patients do not admit to the doctor that they have a drinking problem.

This is what my mom has. I am by no means trying to be a doctor or offer a diagnosis and I know I am not answering your question. It helped us to know that booze is what did this (and continues to do this) to my mom.

Just some food for thought. I may be way off base and if so, I apologize in advance.

Best of luck to you.....and hugs.

I copied a little here, but here is the link to the full story:
dualdiagnosis/alcohol-addiction/wet-brain/


Alcohol Abuse and Its Connection to Wet Brain:

The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) published in 2013 that 86.8 percent of American adults aged 18 or older had consumed alcohol at some time in their lifetime. Drinking alcohol in moderation is not generally a bad thing, and alcohol is even touted as having certain health benefits. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans establishes that drinking in moderation is one drink per day for a woman and two per day for a man, and this is generally considered safe. Anything beyond these levels may constitute binge or heavy drinking, and repeated episodes of heavy or binge drinking may lead to problem drinking or an alcohol use disorder (AUD).

The NIAAA reports that 16.6 million American adults aged 18 and older and 697,000 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 battled an AUD in 2013. Long-term alcohol abuse, or alcoholism, has a multitude of negative health risks and side effects. The NIAAA publishes that up to 80 percent of alcoholics may have a thiamine (B1) deficiency, for example. Thiamine is an essential vitamin responsible for helping the body to successfully break down and utilize sugars in order to produce energy. Thiamine levels are depleted through a poor diet, which is often caused by regular alcohol abuse as alcoholics may make poor nutritional and lifestyle choices. In addition, alcohol withdrawal symptoms may include nausea and vomiting, further depleting essential vitamins and minerals.

Thiamine deficiency can cause brain damage and result in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS), “wet brain.” It is most commonly the result of alcohol abuse. It is difficult to quantify how many people may suffer from Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as the symptoms may be similar to those of alcohol withdrawal or intoxication at times. In addition, many alcoholics may be homeless or have a diminished social circle or support system due to their alcoholism, resulting in fewer formal diagnoses of WKS.

This brain disorder comes on suddenly and is often considered to be “alcohol-related dementia,” as brain damage can cause difficulties with learning and memory functions that may be permanent and irreversible. Oxford University Press estimated that between 10 and 24 percent of brain damage and dementia cases may be related to alcohol abuse. The Alzheimer’s Society reports that “wet brain” may affect around two percent of the general population.

Symptoms of Wet Brain
WKS is actually two different conditions that are commonly considered different stages of one disorder: Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff psychosis.
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Stroke clues are Face(does one side droop) Arms (Ask him to lift one. Are the arms uneven)Speech is is slurred) Take him to the hopital or call 911 if you see these signs.FAST
Take the alcohol out of the house would be my first choice. Stop drinking if you do and insist that others not drink in the house. Then you know for sure.
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A couple of easy "tests" for a possible stroke: Have him
"Stick your tongue out" If it goes to one side call 911
"Hold your hands over your head for a minute" If one drifts down or won't go up call 911.
Slurred speech could be either.
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Why do you think he had a stroke? What are his symptoms?
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Call 911 and have the EMTs evaluate
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