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worriedinCA -
"Actually every state has at least one program where caregivers are paid by the government."

Can you elaborate? Is this something new? Up till now, I only read that a few states have programs to pay for caregivers.
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Reply to polarbear
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Gjstarks, I see from your profile that your friend is 86 years old. Curious if you are a senior yourself. If yes, I learned the hard way that seniors caregiving for other seniors is extremely exhausting, as we really don't have the energy level we once had.

Actually if you want to help your friend, you don't need to sign up with anyone. If you want to be paid by Medicaid [a taxpayer funded program], then your friend would need to apply and be accepted. And depending on what programs are available in your State if you can be paid. The State might offer an Aide to come to the house for a few hours each week to help out.

What are your friend's health issues? Would she be comfortable having you help her with toileting or showering since you are a male?
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Reply to freqflyer
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Ahmijoy May 14, 2019
I would like to very respectfully comment, FF, that personally, I would feel better having a legal caregiving document in hand if I were going to take on the responsibility of caring for a non-relative. So many things in this situation could go “wonky”, especially if this lady has relatives that might turn up at some point. There’s a good chance finances could be involved if they do. If that were to happen, I’d want a legal piece of paper to fall back on. This may be “out there”, but I’d almost be tempted to ask to have a background check done, including fingerprinting since he is male and she’s female. It’s a weird world out there nowadays and I’d want to protect myself anyway I can. Just my humble opinion.
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If your friend can not afford to pay you—In your state, there are at least 2 government programs that provide in-home caregivers. As long as you aren’t your friends legal guardian, you can be paid to be their caregiver. Keep in mind, these programs are needs & income based so your friend will need to meet eligibility requirements. Contact the MO dept of health & senior services for more info.
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Reply to worriedinCali
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No one can do 24/7 care. Even when u love the person, its very hard.

In the state of PA, they have agencies that will train, pay you and supply benefits. Also, check with Medicaid in ur state. If they won't pay u to caregive your friend maybe able to get some help.

There is a poster caregiver on here now that the family expects her to work 24/7 for little pay. This is slave labor. Make sure your ducks are in a row before you get into something like this.
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Reply to JoAnn29
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Polar.Bear is right. Be prepared that even if you find a program that will pay you, it’s not enough to live on. You will have no health insurance provided and no contributions to a retirement fund. When I researched family caregiving, I discovered that in my state, I’d be entitled to $40 a week for 24/7 caregiving.

Its been suggested that when deciding to become a caregiver, one should consult an attorney and have an official contract legally drawn up stating what care you will provide and not provide. Will you pay rent and other costs? Does her homeowners insurance cover you should you become injured? Things like that.
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Reply to Ahmijoy
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It depends on the state your friend lives. Only some states have program where caregivers can be paid by the government, otherwise, your friend will need to pay you. Check with your county Office on Aging.
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Reply to polarbear
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worriedinCali May 14, 2019
Actually every state has at least one program where caregivers are paid by the government.
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