How to keep my mom hydrated this summer?

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Hi all. I take care of my 80 year old mom who has Alzheimer's. I had a tough time keeping her hydrated last summer. Any tips on hydration? Thanks!

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Gatorade is good for hydration. I give it to my mom half water and half Gatorade, but you can give it straight. There are various flavors.
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Reply to MariaDinis
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I found a product at CostCo called Liquid In that is a hydration multiplier, electrolyte drink mix. I add it to my 80 yr old mother's water bottle with a squirt of Mio and it had really helped. Also, it was recommended by her Dr that Gatorade and Powerade will help. Mom gets about 6oz most days. Smaller portions helps.
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Reply to TryingTerrie
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My mom being incontinent, she didn't want to drink a lot. So we gave her lots of jello, she loved jello. Sometimes something as simple as a slice of lemon in her water, and fruits like watermelon (like everyone has mentioned) and pineapple. Of course being down here in Texas, I would offer her iced tea with lemon. Juices are great, especially cranberry and apple (her favorites). Have you thought of bringing her slushies or snow cones? Or freeze juices in icecube trays and put them in her water. Or we would give my mom canned fruits -- peaches, pears, fruit cocktails. In season, when the prices weren't high, strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, peaches, grapes. Hope this helps.
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Reply to MaryLou88
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It might be worth looking at a ‘camel bak’ or ‘hydration pack’, the names I know for a water back pack that cyclists wear so that they can suck sips of water hands free. There is a tube that can attach to a helmet, or probably to spectacles or hearing aids, even to a chair head rest. Some cyclists keep it in their mouth all the time like a cigarette. If part of the problem is keeping the glass filled, or the action of raising the glass to the mouth, this might help. The whole pack could attach to the back of a chair or the side of a bed. They hold about 2 litres, and it doesn’t have to be water.
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Reply to MargaretMcKen
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I believe drinks containing beer are not a good idea. While the drinks suggested may increase liquid intake, they will be excreted rapidly, and will leave your mother more dehydrated than she would have been with no beverage! I have read in several sources that it's a bad idea to drink beer when you're hot and thirsty because you may ultimately be dehydrated from the alcohol.
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Reply to caroli1
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Popsicles?? Jello??   even jello shots (without the liquor :)
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Reply to Myownlife
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Wonderful suggestions.
I find that a plain electrolyte water like Smart Water has been extremely helpful when I sense she may be dehydrated. (Check with your physician as some products contain additional vitamins and minerals).
Jello has been a great way to get fruit and juice into Mom’s diet.
Giving her water to sip before every meal and snack is helpful. i.e. “Take a sip and then I’ll bring your lunch.”
Giving her small glasses of water makes it less of an overwhelming task for her. I also get better cooperation.
Putting Mom’s water into a small pitcher at the start of the day also helped me keep track of what she consumed.
And, if salt intake is not an issue, giving a salty snack can increase thirst. Salt and sugar are also the basic elements, along with water, in oral hydration. It’s a standard preparation used around the world to treat dehydration from diarrhea and illness: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTHSDEP/Resources/1148855-1430226362890/Oral_Rehydration_Solutions.pdf
And, remember to stay hydrated yourself. I focus so much on Mom that I forget all about myself.
Best of luck to you!
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Reply to Gardens
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I second the idea of watermelon, 95% water. My wife loves it. Slice in thin pieces if you can, leaving the rind on to use as a handle, (great for picnics or other outdoor activity that way too) or else cut up in small pieces to be eaten with a fork.
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Reply to Johnny13
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My dad was a dr & he taught us to gently pinch the skin on the back of the hand so that it comes to a peak about 1/2 inch high - let it go & if the person is well hydrated it will go down fairly fast - if it holds the peak for a while then the person is dehydrated & get them something to drink ASAP - if it goes down slowly then they also need to get something to drink soon -

With someone with loose skin you may need to get a base line so that you know what is their normal - FYI ... this works well with kids too - it is a simple test that can be done repeatedly throughout the day - I have even done it with my pointing & middle fingers so that they won't know you're testing them but it takes a bit of practice that way - start on yourself right now

My mom will down a 12 oz diet ice tea in less than 8 minutes but I present it to her as a treat -

I find commercial lemonade too sweet so I add more water & a generous squeeze of realemon juice so it is quite tart -

You can buy pineapple juice & freeze it in ice cube trays so it adds flavour as it melts & other juices too so that the water has some substance towards the end - maybe a small piece of fruit in the ice cube to catch their attention
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Reply to moecam
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First be sure she drinks through a straw you take in less air than drinking from a cup.
Offer her popsicles to help keep her hydrated.
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Reply to Baileyparker
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