How to help father - what's next?

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My father was diagnosed with PD three years ago although I had been noticing changes for years. He is 81. Up until recently he was having a descent quality of life. His mental capacity has diminished greatly these past 3 weeks. He has an acute awareness of what is happening to him. He is afraid and full of anxiety. What can I do for him? He forgets what I tell him or remembers bits and pieces. I want to do what I can to give him the best quality of life but I don't know what else to expect from PD. I am angry at the disease and emotional. I need help trying to figure out what else i can do for him?

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just listen to him very intently . he knows his memory is failing and you can make sure he remains in control of his life , home , and suroundings -- BUT , you have to lean in and listen to his concerns . when he realizes youre relinquishing control to him he'll say thank you more often than youve ever heard out of him in your life .
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Yes, find out as much as you can about Parkinsonism.
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Then you get into counseling with a Parkinson's group, therapist, pastor or priest. There is nothing you can do except love him for the time he has remaining. No one is to blame here, and stressing over it will only make you ill. Most of us are somewhat fearful of dying, and if he really is having a difficult time, ask his doctor to prescribe something to ease the anxiety. Prayer helps!
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I have a 75 year old husband who also has PD. He has had it for 10 years and the medications have had it well under control until the past year. After having been given sedatives while in the hospital the brain function has been come more diminished. I feel so bad for him as he has always been a very active person. For almost no reason at all something triggers anger but he is not violent. Very argumentative and always says things are my fault. Hard not to argue back. He truly doesn't know that mentally anything is wrong. His cognitive problems are the hardest for him. Doing things he has always done, simple things like dressing himself, not require help. It is really hard to tell how soon this disease will progress. All you can do is offer love and care.
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we all don't know the answers but offer suggestions that we have all experienced. I would imagine make him know that you are there for when he needs help or guidance, let him know you care and will do what you can to your best ability to see he is not going thru this alone. whatever you do, don't argue with him, you will only get yourself upset and you will NOT win, because at some point he "might" get argumentative. let him know you are trying to understand but that these things are complex even for the best people to try to figure out. let him know you care and love him. and I am wishing you best of luck.
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My boyfriends mother experiences a mental decline with her parkinsons when she has a uti. I would call the doctor and get orders for a test.
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My 99.5 year old (with Parkinsons, not on meds though, he was very alert - just sometimes had difficulty with shakes, but he used to be a house painter, so was so accustomed to paying close attention to his footing and grab holds in order to work from ladders - it helped him continue his lifelong interest in safety adaptations, to use grab holds around the house as he walked.

His wise comment however was, "Old age is not for sissies."

Best ideas I've had, is pay attention to both your preferred life schedule and also make chunks of time to spend with him - and some of that time, don't talk or help. There will be lots of time spent helping. But it's the quiet times where he can talk, and also allow him to help YOU, so he retains a sense of value, even if his mobility is declining. By making sure you both make time for him, and pay attention to your own needs for separate goals, and continue to develop them, you can help him adapt to his declining abilities, and find ways he can still contribute, even when it appears to the outside world that he cannot.
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Check out the parkinson's foundation website. Lot's of info there
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