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My MIL only ate soup and Jelly and ice cream for ages. Two teaspoons of each. I made all her favourite flavours. I made stew and blitz it until it was smooth added a little cream to thin it out. Then I froze it in ice cube trays. That way I could give her as few, or as many needed. Good Luck
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My mother is in a nursing home and is 90, she recently has slowed down
on eating which is sad. She used to eat so well. One thing I have noticed is that the nursing home has changed the meals they serve the residents. They are horrible, all bland, no taste, very unappetizing just looking at the plate of food. It's ashamed that they don't make an effort to spice up the food with
at least more herbs. I feel your concern. If my mother continues to eat less
and less, she will wither away.
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If the parent is competent, then, I'd follow their lead on what they want to eat. If they have a poor appetite, provide them the foods they do like and let their own desire be their guide. It's my understanding that seniors who have little activity, don't need all the calories they did when they were much more active. Unless, the doctor is concerned about some medical issue, I'd try not to interfere. Most seniors that I know like small portions, finger food, sweets, and ice cream.

If they aren't competent, then, I'd discuss it with their doctor to see what options there are, examine their Medical Directive, research the matter, consider Hospice if needed, etc.
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I agree, more details please. But, have you tried nutritional drinks ? Tell them it's a milkshake. Or their favorite food. Easy to eat items, such as apple sauce, yogurt, etc. Also, put VERY small portions out. I saw residents in my Mom's memory care place be overwhelmed with big plates of food.
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I agree that some more details will help you get more thorough answers but I have a comment anyway: if someone isn't eating enough or has stopped eating never try to force them to eat. I don't mean physically but by cajoling and badgering the person. I understand it can be alarming when someone stops eating but there are various ways to encourage the person to eat without turning them off completely or making a nuisance of ourselves. Try to encourage things that are pleasing to taste as opposed to nutritional value like a chocolate Boost, pudding, jello, popsicles, a small slice of cheddar cheese. Things like this, while not meals, may stimulate the appetite.

My grandmother, whom I cared for before she went into a NH, stopped eating as she declined but she had always loved hot fudge sundaes so once a week I would bring my daughter, who was a toddler at the time and the apple of my grandma's eye, a hot fudge sundae to her NH. The nurses told me my grandma shouldn't be eating it because of her diabetes but at the age (and weight) of 93 I decided it was OK once a week an the nurses began looking the other way.

If an elderly parent doesn't want a slice meantloaf, potatoes, peas, and a piece of bread for dinner get creative. But never show your frustration or exasperation if your parent continues to refuse food. Meal times should be pleasant, something to anticipate, not a battleground of guilt and anxiety. This will just serve to compound the problem.
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More details needed. If she’s in a SNF the food could be less than optimal in flavor, but there were a few favorites my mother would only turn down when she was ill, otherwise her favorite was a McDonald’s fish sandwich. She loved this, especially when it was fresh and hot.
There are meds to improve appetite but are only given for 30 day intervals.
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NickiG, could you give us more information such as what are the medical issues with your parent? Is the parent active during the day? Has the parent lost their sense of taste to food? When was the last time the parent saw a dentist? Does the parent get an upset stomach after eating?
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