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It seems like he got into the habit of peeing in the sink when helping grandma into the bathroom but now does it all the time. I caught him 4 times today peeing in the laundry room sink (main floor) and we do have 3 full bathrooms (one on each of the 3 floors). He does have dementia and signs don't seem to work for him. It doesn't matter if there is anything in the sink he just goes. I would much prefer him to go outside (in the middle of nowhere) then pee in the sink and on the counter. Any ideas how to change this behavior so we don't have a smelly house? Maybe have my 7 year old son take grandpa outside to pee together or something weird like that.


We were trying to figure out why the laundry room smells like peeing and thought maybe we missed a piece of clothes or used diaper from grandma in there but it's grandpa. We know that he has been doing this for over a year and was even peeing in the kitchen sink at their apartment as it only has a bathroom and kitchen. The whole family thought it was grandma's depends smelling up either place because we are the ones that do all the cleaning and trash for them. At least everyone including grandma could laugh about grandpa peeing in the sink. I love my grandparents very much but I'm getting to see them naked a little too much for my liking with all this lovely stuff.

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Lock the laundry room door and put some sort of bell on it to signal that he needs full supervision. Once you hear a sound, start running to direct him. You can also encourage and take him to the bathroom more often. A simple bolt lock set high with a bell attached will give a little time while he tries to work it.
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When ya gotta go... I think maybe the combo of urgency & not remembering where the actual loo is? Sink is first to see in a hurry.

What about a big photo of a toilet on the toilet door?

A this stage, someone in AL would be put on a toileting routine & a staff member prompts them or takes them at regular times like before & after meals. Don't suppose you want that job?
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DH says to hire Mrs Bobbit as carer. I’ve told him that’s not helpful at all.
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Daughterof1930 Jun 2020
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Your grandfather is also peeing a heck of a lot, if you've caught him in the act four times in one day. Plus, if the odour is very strong - so strong that the smell is all over the house even though the urine can easily be washed away - maybe all is not well. How is his physical health?

What does your grandfather say when you ask him about this? And (last question, promise!) does he use the lavatory too, or ever?
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" He does have dementia and signs don't seem to work for him." Well, "He does have dementia." Signs or reasoning just don't work with a broken brain like dementia. Is he using depends? If so and that is not working then it sounds like it's time for him to go to memory care. I wish you the best.
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Countrymouse Jun 2020
Signs often do work to help people with dementia, especially when dementia is combined with visual impairment so that part of the problem is that the person finds it hard to *see* where he is supposed to go or where (or what!) an object is.

Images, colours, symbols can all be used, but the essential thing is that they must be very familiar, very clear and very recognisable to the person. So, for example, a public restroom sign might well make more sense to this gentleman than a pretty ceramic tile saying "bathroom."

I'm beginning to form a hate list of objects that don't look like what they're supposed to be. Top of the list is faucets - some idiot designer has made them beautiful and featureless in mirror-finish chrome and I'm sure he's won awards, but if I can hardly figure out how to use the dam' things how is some poor old man with dementia to do it?
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