How do I find out if my 78 year old mother qualifies for Medicaid?

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She has Medicare and Tricare. We are in need of home care assistance. She is physically disabled. We have been told that Medicare does not cover this.

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Why can't the democrats and the republicans get together and figure out what to do? This is a problem for everyone but the very richest and the very poorest. The only way to avoid this problem is to die young.
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Apply for Aid and Attendance, Medicaid too. You have to spend down to $1500 in Ohio. You are allowed $2400 a month income to be on Medicaid Waiver which pays for assisted living. Pre-pay for a funeral. Talk to a good estate planning attorney. Good luck.
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There needs to be a more universal and more comprehensive way to fund our long-term care expenses when we become elderly, frail, afflicted with dementia and unable to take care of ourselves. As it is now, there is no limit to what a person can spend on himself during his "golden years" -- gambling, entertainment, expensive vacations, an RV, etc. and when he runs out of money he can go onto government assistance Medicaid. Someone else might live frugally, buy long-term care insurance, forego the expensive lifestyle, and be able to pay for his own care at least for a while. Unfortunately, there is not a lot of disincentive for people to live large and spend their money on their own pleasures -- except that a Medicaid nursing home is less likely to be a person's first choice of where to live. You lose an element of choice when you are not a private-pay. Since ours is a consumer-driven economy, people are bombarded with advertising encouraging them to spend. Truly, there should be an education campaign to urge people to manage their resources with an assumption that they WILL have long-term care expense at the end of life. And it is NOT cheap. I'd like to see Medicare expanded to include coverage of long-term care, at least partially, because no middle-class or lower-class person can possibly afford the high cost of such care on his own.
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the Reason for the 5 year look back is most people( to their disadvantage do not understand Medicaid).
Many become indignant when you address it; "Mom has $300,000, that is not us".
at $8,000 a month or more how long does each $100,000 last?
So most people will not do proper preplanning, and when a Nursing Home environment is needed; are forced to use all their assets.
Even if assets are transferred to Irrevocable Trust (not revocable), the trust is overridden by the 5 year look back.until 5 years passes
A house must also be placed in trust to 'protect it'
How many families end up helping towards care, parent goes into NH and have to go thru spend down, they think they will get reimbursement out of a house sale, but it is subject to Medicaid Estate recovery
Did not do proper Funeral trust planning either.
Those who think wartime era Veterans Aid and Attendance will pick up the tab must know the Veteran gets $1,732 a month and surviving spouse gets $1,113
There are planning parameters for that, and preplanning before applying is critical,
I meld VA, Medicaid and Medicaid exempt Funeral trust planning, into preparations I do for families in Georgia Asset Preservation to supplement Medicaid Care is a great outcome when that works with some asset cases.
If someone is on VA and goes on Medicaid in a NH, the VA allows the Veteran $90.

I have seen many families inquire a bout proper VA planning assistance, and not follow thru, and completely disregard the parallel need for Medicaid Planning,
to their dismay sorry a few years later.
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You can also call your local Senior Information & Assistance or Aging & Disability Resources (you can find your local office with the Eldercare Locator at www.eldercare.gov) . The staff there should be able to help you figure out if she qualifies, because each state has different Medicaid programs with different rules regarding eligibility, resource and income limits.

They should also be able to give you information on elder law attorneys in your area that you could consult with. Many people I work with only have their Social Security, so an elder law attorney isn't really necessary for them because qualifying is pretty straightforward. But for people who have many resources (savings, property, annuities, pensions, etc) an elder law attorney might be a good option to help them figure everything out.

Your local Senior Information & Assistance/Aging & Disability Resources should also be able to give you information on the local resources for getting assistance with veteran's benefits, such as Aid & Attendance. A local American Legion, vet center or veteran's clinic should have Veterans Service Officers or social workers who could help you with applying for benefits.

Hope that helps!
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Consult an elder care attorney. There are ways to get around the spend down and other issues to apply for Medicaid. Don't spend down anything yet...Consult an elder care attorney first. Most consultations are free or even if you have to pay...think of the problems they can help you solve. They will be able to help or they will tell you they can't.
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Yes, there's a 'look back' period for Medicaid, too, and I suspect it may be lengthened as the baby boom ages and the demand increases. Imagine if everyone quickly transferred their wealth to their children just in time to let the taxpayers pay for their nursing care. Medicaid is meant for the truly indigent, not as 'free' long term care insurance. If someone has the funds to pay for their own care, they should.
It's sad when someone works hard all their life to accumulate a nest egg to leave to their children and then uses it up paying the nursing home. The question we ought to be asking ourselves as a society is – why has it become so costly to die?
That's a topic for another thread!
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my dad has a Irrevocable trust with some stock and an annuity only, does this mean he has to use this all up before he can apply for medicaid?
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OK. Thanks, Marie.
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I believe the look back period for a Irrevocable Trust is 5 years for Medicaid.
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