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My 59 year old husband has just been diagnosed with MCI.
As a family, we had noticed subtle changes the past 2 years, but chalked it up to aging.
He then had weight loss surgery last December. His memory issues, confusion & agitation have gotten a lot worse after the surgery. He is still working full time, but I don't know how long he will be able to hide his difficulties.
I am frustrated, worried, scared ...... I don't even know where to begin.
Any advice ?

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Your husband could be having nutritional problems because of the weight loss surgery. Nutritional deficiencies, especially with viatamin b12, can cause dementia like behavior. If he's not absorbing his nutrients, a highly absorbable ligquid may help.

Not all people with MCI move on the dementia, but many do. So the time is now to do everything for his health that could possibly reverse symptoms. Work closely with a physician, but also, perhaps, a nutritionist.

Please update us when you can,
Carol
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I hear you, Tammey! So many acronyms tossed around on this site, and half the time I have to look them up. (It'd be nice to spell it out the first time, then use the acronym in future references.) Apparently MCI is Mild Cognitive Impairment.
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I agree with Carol, but would like to add a couple thoughts. First remedy his nutritional needs. Post-surgery memory loss sometimes cures itself, but not always and not always completely.
He is young enough to be a candidate for Early Onset Alzheimer's (EAOD). I suggest that you obtain a complete family history at least at far back to his great grandparents to see if they had any signs of dementia). Secondly, I suggest you keep a strict log of his behavior, so that you and your doctor can see trends in it. Keeping a log is often difficult when so many other things are going on with your husband. But it does not need to be in perfect prose; just jot down unusual behaviors by date. This will help your doctor to see a progression in his behavior. Also, learn all you can about EOAD so that you can watch for its symptoms. A good DVD is the "The Sum Total of Our Memory." which shows three everyday couples coming to grips with Alzheimer's Disease. You can buy it at www.thesumtotalmovie.com I suggest this because you will learn so much about the progression of EOAD and how those with this diagnosis feel about their disease.
I suggest you find out about his performance reviews at work. Memory problems often show up at work. Often his co-workers see memory loss more clearly than family members. If his performance reviews have been declining, then his company may try to terminate his employment.
You should investigate your husband's employee benefits and retirement plans. If you can accelerate contributions to a 401K or similar program, then do so. If he is no longer able to work, then you will need to tap into existing resources. I urge you to cut down on all unnecessary expenses and pay down your credit cards if you have them.
If you live near a memory clinic or center for AlZ research, then I would obtain a second opinion from it because they have better diagnostic tools. A memory clinic can offer better ongoing support if you should need it. For example, a former client (with EOAD) was acting aggressively, and her paranoia was increasing. Her children had her admitted to a specials unit at John Hopkins University Hospital for two weeks. The physicians adjusted her medications. Now she is even-tempered again. Of course, you don't need this level of support now or perhaps ever. But learning about these resources in your area could be helpful later on.
Even though I know about EOAD through experience, I urge to consult a financial planner and an elder care attorney to help you plan for the future.
All the best.
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MCI is mild cognitive impairment. Here's how you deal with it. As Carol said, it may or may not lead to dementia. You deal with it by doing everything you can for his health and focus on enjoying each day together. Expect the best, but prepare for the worst. If you have not done this already, have a will, POA, and health care proxy done for both of you. Do "living wills" and talk about your preferences regarding end of life care. Consult with an elder law attorney about how best to proceed in light of the possibility of one of you having to go into a nursing home. Ask him to fully explain your options and how to preserve most of your estate from medicaid if that should happen. I would even go visit nursing homes and assisted living facilities (without your husband at this point) so that you have a familiarity with all your options. As you've visiting each, ask if you would be ok with living there, or with your husband living there. Make notes and a file on everything. Then, take the file, file it away, and enjoy your life. Don't worry about or dread the future because you really have no way of knowing what will happen. Dread ruins today, needlessly. I have found in my journey with my mother's Alzheimer's that I had sufficient strength for each stage as it came. When she was first diagnosed in 2006, I couldn't sleep. Images of her in a dirty nursing home, mute, with a dirty diaper, tormented me. Fast forward to 2015, she has been in a nursing home for a year and it is not at all what I thought (dreaded) it would be. I wasted that time worrying about something that didn't happen. Don't make that mistake. But don't make the mistake of being totally unprepared, either. That was also my mistake. A kind doctor at the psych ER my mother was taken to gave me the best advise ever. Both his mother and his grandmother had Alzeimer's. He said, "Plan for two steps ahead." Because of that advise, by the time my mom was ready for nursing home care, I had contacted 22, visited 16, and applied for the 4 best, one of which accepted her. A year into her stay there, I consider that a happy ending.
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I am sorry for assuming that everyone knew that MCI is Mild Cognative Imparement.
Thank you for all your input. I am reading everything I can, but having a hard time helping my husband realize what stepes we need to take for our future.
The Dr. Recommended he let me handle the finances, but Im having a difficult time getting him to let go.
He has had a full nutritional work up and nothing shows he is lacking, but my gut tells me differently. I try everything I can to get him to eat, but he just won't eat much.
2nd opinion is in a month.
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Christine, what wonderful information. This is helpful for everyone facing old age and all that bring with it. Thank you for such a well thought out easy to follow answer!
PPollard, so much good advice already, but as Christine has said plan but dont worry. We spend so much time worring about what might be that we miss what is. This is a strong support network so keep coming back, update us and draw strength from the pack.

One trick I learned to help a client with memory problems was use sticky notes, on his desk, on his mirror, in his breifcase, you get the picture. They just may help him at work to keep going. Take care and know you are not alone.
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OMG. Carol's first response is totally spot on. Is he taking all his supplements and in a follow up program post-op? Get his ***thiamine level***, B12 level, and other nutritional issues checked pronto. We had a Wernicke-Korsakoff case post bariatric surgery on the rehab unit and the faster you get that reversed the better chance for a decent outcome. I hope you can get something done in that regard tomorrow - I am serious, do not wait even another weekend if you can possibly help it. 59 is not old enough to blame anything but very mild forgetfulness and need for reading glasses on "aging" (!) ...especially for a guy, who does not have to deal with menopause!! Get to the doctor ASAP, ideally a good neurologist...
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yesTammey. using initials leaves us in the dark. I too would like to know what is MCI.
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He is a bit young to have MCI. Did you get a second opinion?
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Have you had hubby's electrolite and CBC done? Also check about the B12. A shortage of the B's can mimic dementia and even be fatal.
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