Does anyone know how SSI works?

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I'm in the process of securing a senior facility for my mom that accepts SSI. Does anyone know how this works and if her money needs to be exhausted before SSI kicks in?

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Don't forget the VA benefits a spouse is entitled too. My sister gets SSI plus my dad's VA benefits/pension. It comes in two separate checks. She is allowed 3K in Ohio. My mom gets widows pension now but had disability pension until she turn 63. After you have check all the resources that your mother is entitled too, then check into her medical insurance. The word Long term care will be explained in her policy. Does she have a supplemental health insurance? Or Medicaid? A nursing home will ask you about funeral/burial plans that she may own. They will ask for her bank statements to look for large withdrawals etc. I found the nursing home director very helpful when I was looking at mother's options.
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If your mother was married over ten years and your father worked, she could receive one-half of his social security which might be higher than SSI. Talk to social security about both options, and good luck!
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You can apply for SSi for a person who is recieving SS retirement if the retirement payment is below the SSI payment of $710.00 per month.
You may have also applied for Medicaid Waiver to help pay for assisted living for your Mom.
If your Mom is divorced or a widow she can apply for SS retirement based on her husbands returement and get 50% of the amount he recieves or recieved. That is usually higher than the SSI payment of $710.00/
Can you clarify a little more what programs you are applying for and what type of facility she needs?
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SSI is for children with disabilities and adults with disabilities who do not have a work record of their own to qualify for Social Security. Sometimes a senior who has a disabling condition and has not enough work experience can get SSI. Check out the rules on the Social Security website ssa.gov. An adult who receives SSI can have no more than $2000 in their own name although certain types of trust funds are allowed.
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