How to protect my assets if admitted for long-term care?

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Is there anything I can do to protect my home and other assets should I be admitted for long-term care and am put on Medicaid?

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As one of the Expert Contributors to this site, I happen to have just the book for you: How to Protect Your Family's Assets From Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets. I wrote this book for folks like you who need to know both the rules and the planning techniques to save as much money as possible while qualifying for Medicaid. Best of luck in this difficult process!
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You save for your retirement...you save for your old age...you save so you can maintain a particular lifestyle. Why is your health care not considered a part of your old age, a part of your lifestyle?
If you want to save your assets to pass on to your children let them pay for your care now so that you can pass money and a building on to them when you pass.
I guess what I am saying is if you have money saved why would you expect taxpayers to pay for your medical care when you have assets that can be used.

And why would you want Medicaid to pay for what might be a lesser facility than you might want when you could use your assets and get into a much nicer facility that would probably keep you there once you do have to go onto Medicaid, if you have to.

There are rules that are followed for a reason
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I always laugh (sort of) when people want to try and beat the system. My neighbor was a crusty old bachelor who didn't want the Gomnent (read Government) taking his money. So, he deeded his house to his nephew to escape his asset being taken by Medicaid or whatever. When he couldn't take care of himself any more, his nephew put him in a cheap, dirty, assisted living, sold the house, took the money and moved to Las Vegas, NV. and never came back to even see the old guy.
So, my advice is be careful, very careful, giving your house or other assets to anyone, besides, there is always the gift tax, etc. Get some attorney's help if you go that route.
Then, I knew a gal whose husband, thinking she couldn't handle money, had an attorney and the bank be co-executers. They charged so much that she lost 9 rental properties and her home. She basically lost everything.
So, be careful in your planning.
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Medicaid rules are different for each state. You would need to find a lawyer who specialized in Medicaid and elder law for the state of Connecticut. Please realize that anything you try to set up now will still be subject to Medicaid Recovery after you die if you are over 55 or be assessed a transfer penalty before you receive services unless you don't require services until 5 years after the date that you "take action to protect your home and other assets". Medicaid expects that you will use your assets for your own care (rather than protect them for the benefit of friends and family after your death) before you apply for benefits intended to help low-income/poverty level individuals. If you have a family member as an in-home caregiver, you may be able to have them apply for exemptions on the house from Medicaid Recovery if they provide care to you that keeps you out of long-term care for at least 2 years. The lawyer can also tell you whether any actions taken prior to now will be subject to a 5 year look-back or transfer penalty. Medicaid is also limited by your monthly income (pensions, Social Security, etc) so a lawyer is your best resource for how it works in your state.
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Realize that you are not "put on Medicaid". Medicaid is an "at need" entitlement that you have to apply to and be eligible for both medically & financially. Medicaid is quite different than Medicare or SS - which are entitlements that you have actively participated in by $ paid into FICA.

5 year look back basically means having everything done before the end of this year and not ever needing to apply for Medicaid before January 2022.
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This is definitely not a do-it-yourself project. Contact an attorney specializing in Elder Law.
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Medicare and SS and NOT "entitlements".
It is not a program that one is entitled to...it is EARNED

I paid for 51 years. It is my own money.
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Purchase a long term care policy so at least the first years of care will be paid.
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I second the long term insurance advice. Buy that policy as soon as you can, before age 61 is best and least expensive. It is pricey but can give you peace of mind. There are many kinds out there so get a trusted advisor to help you. Hybrid policies are nice because they can be used as LTC or life insurance should you pass before needing long term care. You are not eligible for Medicaid until you are almost destitute and then there is the 5 year look back...
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In spite of the previous rant, I am in the same boat. My husband, 71, is ALZ stage 5 to 6, but healthy as a horse. I plan to keep him home as long as possible, to keep him happy and to hopefully save money. He could also live to age 94.

There's a program in Massachusetts called some kind of partnership. If you get LTC insurance, they will let you keep more of your house or assets. I got it for me, but DH was already too gone to remember 5 animal names, and was turned down.

I have done the will, the POA's, and the trust. My next step is to consult a Medicaid attorney about how to use my assets in the most medicaid-wise manner.

Cry-baby moment: I'm only 69, in great health. Our only child is a daughter, 25, who might need some help, and would sure love to go on a Caribbean vacation with us or with me before we wither up and die. I'm glad - make that willing - to take care of him as long as possible. He's a good guy and deserves it. But I'm a "good guy" too. Don't I deserve a little retirement fun?

Boo hoo. I know I'm luckier than lots of people. I have some money. I'm healthy. We have good insurance. DH is not violent or hard to care for. All he wants is my attention, 18 hours a day. He is often grateful. "I can't complain but sometimes I still do. Life's been good to me so far."
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