How often doe those of us with Alzheimer's think of suicide?

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Doc's have said I have it now for apx 6 year. I am a Vietnam vet. Not a lot of help from them. Lots of depression; just gave me Zoloft hoping it will help..

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Hes a Vietnam Vet Uncle Plucky suits him xxxx
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First, sherryanne, even the Alzheimer's organization says that there is nothing to support the idea that aluminum contributes to the disease. That idea has been debunked.

UncleYucky, I don't know if you have read up on Zoloft, or antidepressants, but many of them have the side effect of suicidal thoughts. Please tell the doctor if this is a new development. There are many different medicines that you can try. Plus you do need to give the medicine a little time to work. I don't have an answer to your original question, but I would presume there's a lot of stress and hopelessness on both sides of the situations. Caregivers feel depressed a lot of times due to the stress.

I hope you get to feeling better and change your name to Uncle Lucky. That's the way I read it at first.
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Dear Uncle --- Or maybe, Cousin, since we're apparently from the same generation --- my heart goes out to you. I don't have Alzheimer's but I would bet dollars to doughnuts that everyone who has it, or fears it, thinks about suicide. I think we'd be irresponsible not to!

My question is, how long does a person have after he or she learns he has it, to be able to make some kind of rational, purposeful decision about it? I understand why the others on this forum are encouraging you to reach out for help. Those months, or years, of functionality could potentially be great. Please do reach out --- you should make the rest of your life the best life you can. (Read "Still Alice" or see the movie.) But at the same time I wish we could address the implications of your question more directly. You're touching on something very important and we should be careful not to trivialize it. Love, Realtime
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Dear UncleYucky
Sorry, I forgot to finish my sentence about the Helpline. If you're not in the Boston area, they will be able to direct you to one near you. Also, I forgot to mention that you should change your name to something more positive - you are not Yucky!! Maybe you could call yourself Lucky or something - you survived Vietnam and probably went through more than most can only imagine.
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Dear UncleYucky
Don't forget how special you are. You also served in Vietnam. See if you can find a support group in your area, and keep taking the Zoloft because sometimes medicine can take a while to get into your system. Also, I'm not sure where you live, but in Boston, there is a place called Samaritans with numerous Helpline numbers. Even if you're not near Boston, if you call the toll-free Helpline, 1-877-870-4673 (24 hours a day). Remember that you are important, keep up your health (eating well helps), take some time for yourself to re-charge, walking helps too. Also, this site is filled with very supportive people. If you need to vent, this is a great place to come to. God bless you.
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We are a generation of ALZ prone individuals. The food we eat, the pots we cook in and the air we breathe is laced with ALZ producing chemicals. The best bet is to eat as clean as possible. Avoid ALL aluminum and teflon cook ware. Avoid any factory farm meat, eggs, or dairy. Eat only organic veggies. That seems to be the best bet. An interesting article I read lately suggests that the Argentine Tango helps symptoms of Parkinsons. Maybe being active can help ALZ. Mother has vascular dementia, but fortunately not ALZ. She comes and goes. I also question if there is a god. After 30 years of research, I believe that we are a collective unconscious mind and as far as a benevolent father/mother - it doesn't exist. We create our own reality collectively. It's hard to unplug from the collective. I think it's like Startrec and the Borg. Call me crazy.
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Every one has good word for you and we you me and they are a team depression no going to keep you down be course you have us make no mistake there is a god and he loves you try to not be alone talk topeople pets and join groups let them know you have a memory problem lots of people do don't dwell on black thoughts look for the light as you go on you will need a helper but who doesn't I h as be there are groups who help if you don't have family and I am here too I will pray for you god is a live in me and in you he needs you to help other
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I knew a man who was a vietnam vet, made it out without a scratch, and a few years later, got shot at a local liqour store. Looking at the news doesn't help much either. Hang in there, keep airing out and this is a good place to start....My mom has ALZ, aunt has it, and MIL looks like she's getting it too,,,,so, nothing in life is a guarantee, just DO GOOD, HELP OUT When you can. This will help you too.... I try to help...When the grocery cart fell over, I tried helping the little kid. My daughter said I just got in the way and asked stupid stuff, like : Do you want a bag of frozen peas?" Find a good place, fun things to do. It's okay to feel down, but do get back up, one way, some way. I actually took a mental break today. I slept until 3:00 pm today. That's why Im up now, but it felt good to take this day to myself.....Im finding I do this almost every Saturday now.... I'' get over it......Lool up and Thank someone for something nice...I am also realizing I'm thanking my dog more often for going for a walk with me...My cats for yowling for food, and my family for screaming at me, what's for dinner? I tell them to look in the cupboards, I'm sleeping.......
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Uncle Plucky (nicer than Yucky) Have you ever considered that you may have PTSD? It is not uncommon for it to go unrecognised and untreated for decades and then one small thing (large in your case) triggers it. Go to your doc get some antidepressants and talk. Alzheimers is different for everyone - in terms of speed of development and indeed what it looks like as it progresses.

If your desire is not to have to live through the latter stages of the disease then I have to say I feel the same way - thats not depression thats realism and personal choice. Our love goes out to you hun xxStay Strong
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Are you considering the diagnosis is causing these thoughts, or, were you struggling with these thoughts the past six years? Or before that? And you have survived those times.
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