How often should a bed ridden person be turned?

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My brother told me his father-in-law had gotten bed sores and they were very difficult to treat and very painful. So I looked it up and got my dad, who became bedridden last week and this week adjusts his position very seldom, an alternating pressure mattress - there's a very inexpensive, highly-rated one by Vive on Amazon. He was up and running yesterday - we got the hospice to send people in for a lift assist to get it on the bed/him off/on. At first (yesterday) he was really happy with it as it was more comfortable than the hospital bed they installed at home (you put it on top of a mattress) - today it's perhaps not amazing, but given the reviews it should help prevent/allow to heal pressure sores. No flipping the patient around unless they ask for it. Without one, every two hours sounds horrid - you have to interrupt their sleep and your day for it.
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Speaking from experience granted it's a new learning curve (MIL had latest stroke Dec 2016 making left side immobile) Range of motion is a must, I work her legs and arms 4-5 times a day. Rotating her every 2 hours during the day, but well you have to sleep as well...... So we do every 2 hours during the day, get her comfy at night, then start again in the morning. We have had 1 pressure sore, right over the tail bone, kept it at a L 2, finally healed but it is a Battle to keep it from starting again due to the boughts of diarrhea.. So just do your best, it does not make you a horrible person if one develops just keep your nurses/doctors in the loop and take all the help you can get. The horrible part is insurance will not pay for a pressure sore relieving mattress unless the have 2 stage 3 or 1 stage 4 sore. Baffles the mind that insurance will not help prevent.
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Also do range of motion exercises to prevent painful contractures. You can Google for details.
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Every two hours, cwillie is correct. 
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Make sure you check on skin conditions every day over hips, lower spine and ankles. Things can go bad in a very short time
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If they are totally immobile best practice is to reposition every 2 hours.
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