How much is too much meds?

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I am in 4th stage of PD I take 200mg Stalevo every 4 hrs around the clock and 10-100 sinemet 6am 200mg stalevo, 8am 10-100carb/levo , 10am 200mg stalevo, 12 noon 10-100 carb/levo so on and so forth around the clock giving me a total of 1800mg levodopa. If this does not relieve freezing of body and hard consistent tremoring there is nothing left and I am going home. Is any one out there on this much meds?

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Not knowing anyone ‘s age, this advice might be useless. You must go to the gym and cycle for 45 mins, 5 days a week. When I started my husband on this regiment, within a short while, maybe a couple of weeks, he needed smaller dosages of carbidopa. Plus, he feels good after a workout.

I saw a report on medicinal marijuana for tremors. If you can get the right blend, the shakes begin to settle down.

MJ Fox Foundation just announced a drug in the 3rd trial that seems to be working to keep people mobile. My husband falls a lot and no workout program will prevent that from happening. Hopefully a drug will.

I’ve tried everything with his drugs. Up dosage, down dosage, I get the same outcome....he falls. I hate to put him in a wheelchair full time but the falling has to stop. My husband is 67.
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bestgardner,
I know I am getting to you late but hopefully this will be helpful. My Dad is on a very similar medication schedule--he doesn't take meds at night though, I just wake him at 6am, give him the Stalevo and hopefully he sleeps til it kicks in.

One thing that has been helpful to us is to schedule his medication so that his on times are at mealtimes. So if he takes meds at 6am, he can eat at 7am and on and on through out the day. He takes the medication every 4 hours during the day. Also be careful you are not eating a lot of protein when you take your medication as it lessons the effect of the Carbidopa Levodopa, which again, is why taking the pills between meals works better.

We have a speech therapist that has been very helpful with the swallowing challenges that come with Parkinson's and has give us tons of guidance on food. He eats a lot of soft foods, crockpot soups etc. I'd definitely check in with your doctor on the depression. My mom has Alzhiemer's and she is taking Zoloft now and the difference is night and day!
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Have you and your doctors discussed whether surgical options might help you?
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There are no cures. The best we can do at this time is to minimize symptoms. The ways to do that may involve lifestyle changes, such as exercise or sleep habits and aslo medications.

How many meds are too many?

One is too many if it isn't successfully addressing a symptom. Not helping? Don't take it.

Fourteen is not enough if there is a fifteenth that would improve the effectiveness of three of the other drugs. Using too few meds or too low dosages is counterproductive. You may have side effects without having the benefits.

The right number of pills is the number when each and every pill contributes to managing one or more symptoms, and no effective pill is overlooked.

Do we have sure-fire ways of determining this level? Sorry, I don't think so. But we often can come close. Work with a doctor who is expert in your disease, and with a pharmacist. Realize that all parties are doing their best.
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There are no cures.
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There is no cure for Parkinson’s, unfortunately. It is a progressive disease.
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Bestgardner, your doctor (neurologist) is the best person to determine the dosages you need. Can you or your cousin call the doctor to see if an adjustment can be made? Also, there are foods that may interfere with your meds. Do you follow the dietary precautions? Are you able to eat well or are you just not feeling hungry? Please look into a local support group. They may be able to give you more insight to things that you can do to help yourself. My heart goes out to you -- I'll be in prayer for you.
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No I live with my cousin, he took me away from the assisted living I was in and was abused. I take care of myself, sort of, my cousin brings me to Dr.s, gets food, and anything I might need. I have one half of the house with a nice room. I am eternally grateful for what I have. I still fight this disease every day, but am noticing more weakness, not eating, depression.
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Bumping this up, Gardner. Are you currently in the hospital?
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