How long will late stage AD patient stay in Memory Care facility?

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I have been told that with advanced dementia, the patient is better cared for in a Memory Care facility. Their staff is trained to work with dementia patients and they are more secure. What happens when the patient goes into the late stage of AD and is not able to do anything for themself or even move around? I saw a person in a wheelchair once who could not sit up by himself in a Memory Care facility, but was not sure if that was the norm. Anyone know?

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How long they stay is dependent on their general health, many have co-morbidities like heart failure, arthritis, vision loss and hearing loss. For many it is a very short trip, for others a few years.
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Yes, Sunnygirl, Memory Care covers a wide range of dementia stages.

Is your loved on in Memory Care now? I don't think that Memory Care is necessary or always the best choice for those with dementia. It is necessary for persons who wander, to provide additional security. Patients with severe behavioral problems that disturb others may need the higher staff ratio. But someone who is not mobile and not disturbing others may be better off or at least as well off in a regular nursing home.
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Okay. That's how it looked to me in the place I visited. I just wasn't sure they would do all of that care in a Memory Care facility, since it sounds like the care you would get in a Nursing Home.

So, is it safe to say that the Memory Care unit may contain residents of varying stages of dementia. Some may wander and be forgetful, but others may be totally dependent for their care and no mobility.
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If someone gets to that point whether in memory care or regular skilled care then the staff does everything for them. Gets them up in the morning, gets them dressed, takes them to meals (in a wheelchair), feeds them, lays them back down for a nap, gets them up again for dinner, feeds them dinner, changes them into pajamas and lays them back down to sleep at night. The person would be considered total care.

The person would also be placed near staff during the day so they're not alone, the staff would change their Depends as needed, brush their teeth, brush their hair....anything you can think of that a human needs on a day to day basis the staff would do for the person.

It's very sad for someone to get to that point.
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