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I worked at several Skilled Nursing Homes throughout where I lived and 7-3 shift had the most staff then staff would have a few less CNA's on 3-11 the even less on 11-7 but helping someone to potty only takes a few moments and a caring CNA would try to get to their client as soon as humanly possibly so it shouldn't take more than 10 minuntes max unless there is an emergency on the floor where you loved one and if some one comes in and states some will be in shortly then disappears then report that person to the nurse just make sure to get the name of the person so you make sure you report the right person
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We always want our loved one's needs attended to right away. Expectations always have to be adjusted in facilities. That's the reality. They're never going to be perfect. Even with monitoring with regular visits.
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Sure, sometimes the CNA's are busy...but! My wife is in a nursing home. If the staff is busy that's understandable....but, there are those times a worker, not even working that section, will see the light flashing outside the room after the button has been pressed, walk into the room, turn it off and walk off. sometimes maybe say...:"I'll send someone."This is not allowed, though they may argue with you. The rule from administration at my wife's nursing home, is, if someone comes in, turns off the light then leaves without tending to the resident, they are to immediately turn it back on before walking out. this is because the light time is recorded at the nurses' desk. Trying to be nice about it, (letting them leave it off, when they walk off, and not turning it back on, has often resulted in no one coming back at all. the situation can and does change day by day as staff changes take place, sometimes employees of the home and sometimes temporary agency staff. Your loved one, as well as others, in a nursing home must be always monitored 24/7. Some residents are disabled and cannot reach the light switch and must be checked on regularly. Abuse can result in tragedy.
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If your loved one is in a NH, there is no way around having to wait. Diapering is not a better option. They sit in their waste. One of the reason, Mother is home with me. They deserve better treatment but facilities are mostly short staffed. Very difficult situation to deal with. Good luck.
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My mother has a port potty next to her bed. Its gross but convenient. However,my father can't walk. He has complained about waiting over an hour for assistance. He does wear Depends, but who wants to shit in their pants! I have found this duty for nurses is at an all time low! They really don't want the task, but you would think at night, they would have more time. The family & friends of our beloved need to constantly bring up this issue with not only the staff, but the directors, the managers or even the executives of the faculty!
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My son was 34 when he was so disabled that a nursing home was deemed necessary. The staff was constantly upset with him because he kept getting out of bed into his wheelchair and going into the bathroom himself - and falling. The problem was that when he needed to go, he would ring the bell and wait, and wait, and wait, and finally couldn't wait any more. They told him they would be more responsive, but they didn't. Then they made it more restrictive for him to get out of bed. Sometimes you just can't win. They didn't use adult diapers, either.
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This was a major problem for me. My mom had a broken wrist with a sling, dementia and was a total wreck when I arrive at rehab/skilled nursing level care at 8am in morning. Her room mate told me she pushed button and yelled snd cried for 2 hours. Her roommate also pushed button. This facility was suppose to be one of the best in our area. No excuse acceptable for me.
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Six minutes? When my father was in a SNF for 2 1/2 years the staff might come in the room to turn the light off (maybe they record the light time), say they were busy helping others (mostly true), and maybe come back 30 minutes later.
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If you are seeing this, you could assist, until staff can get to your loved one. If everyone ate at the same time, it is possible everyone has to use the commode at the same time. But, talk to staff and see if waiting times can be shorter.
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We agree. I think the standard in our state according to one attorney with whom we spoke was 6 minutes from button push to response. Is that a reasonable amount of time? No, not really. Is that often exceeded? Yes, and for the reasons clearly stated above. Does that push residents to take matters into their own hands and perhaps beyond their abilities? Sure does. It introduces major fall risks amongst the others discussed above. Does the use of depends or adult diapers solve the problem? Maybe in some ways but then the staff can rely on those when they're too busy or pre-occupied to address your loved one's needs. That will result in your upset calls to the state oversight and licensing boards that get made in response to finding your loved one in a puddle. Been there, done that.

Because we don't know the context of your question...is the patient in a facility or in your home...we're making the assumption we're answering the question you're asking. If your loved one is at home or your home, as fast as possible would be the best answer in terms of a response.
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Laura- you are lucky. Sometimes there are 20 person ALFs with one (lightweight) girl on staff at night. What happens if a heavy man needs helps getting out of bed at night? Huge injury risk for resident and caregiver. All the more reason for people to "help themselves" as much as possible as long as it is safe.
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My mom is now in a 6-bed AL. Two people are available at all times. The Depends cost is a fraction of what it was, meaning far less humiliating accidents for my mom.
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Everything ties together- if you "have to go" in the middle of the night do you really want to wait any long length of time? Pretty soon there will be accidents and loss of self-esteem as the situation deteriorates- no wonder people get depressed. What if a person (that still has some level of independence) could safely get themselves in/out of bed, relieve themselves, and get back to sleep right away? Improved independence, self-esteem, strength conditioning, etc. There are new products available that most people know nothing about- if I can help please let me know.
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waiting to use the bedside commode?? Be prepared for the outcome.
Sometimes wearing depends is the only safeguard
If it a pee call then hope they are giving OAB medications to make the wait time posssible.
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I agree with what has been said....I would press the issue....On the other hand, the CNAs at my wife's rest home often have up to 20 residents to tend to....It is a tough situation.
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There should not be a wait. Elderly over 85 really can't wait. If your love one isn't being properly cared for , consider moving them.
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Nursing home? 15 minutes at the most. Use a stopwatch. Most cell phones have a stopwatch in the tools section.
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