How long does the grieving process last?

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I know it varies on the individual. Everyone is really upset around the house because of the death. It hasnt affected me i guess because seeing suffering bothered me more. Im just trying to figure out what the others are going through.

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think two years and you might be surprised at the results . at two years youre thinking that its just high time to go on with your life . moms gone g dammit . she wants me to recover and make my own life worthwhile .
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I think im just spent and ready to move forward. Its kinda like they are grieving but they are trying to put the blame on someone else. Ive heard you could have done this or that and i just say whatever my conscience is clear, is yours. Its just strange for me to watch people grieve so much now when they ignored and treated him so poorly in life.
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Tacy, I think if it was your child or spouse it would be different. My mom has gone through a difficult time grieving my father mostly because she feels regret for the way she treated him. She brings it up a lot ( how she wishes she'd behaved differently). I guess grief is extremely complex . You had no real attachment to him so it makes sense that you have no grief.
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Grief is individual and personal. There's "steps" you go through, and healthy and unhealthy ways to grieve...but to each his own.
I miss my dad, but wouldn't have him back in a second, he was so miserable. I think grief over an elderly person who has lived a long life is very different than the grief you feel over the loss of a child or younger person whose life was cut short by illness or accident.
When my brother died, I felt absolutely nothing. We were estranged for many, many years, he was a toxic individual and I honestly felt that his death relieved us all of the burden of worrying that he might do next to mess up his kids' and ex-wives lives. That's sad, in its own way.
Some people are so dependent on another than when they die, that person 'dies' too. A friend of mine (in her early 60's) lost her husband to pancreatic cancer. Literally, he was diagnosed and died before they could even absorb the diagnosis. She was in a nursing home, hopelessly depressed within 6 months and has been there 5 years. I have another friend who lost her hubby in a car accident the week before last Christmas. She has continued her life and though I know she has her "moments" she is still living happily and is helping to raise 3 grandkids.
Personally, believing strongly in an afterlife gives me hope and peace.
Also, I think the less involved you are in a person's life (I'm referring to parents, specifically) the worse the grief. The "coulda, woulda, shoulda's come up and the guilt makes the grief worse. Just my opinion.
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I guess im kind of odd in a way. I just have never found death to be a sad event. My grandfather died in 2002 and i never cried or was upset. I guess its the same now. I am getting a little annoyed because everyone is asking me questions about what their father talked to me about and what he said about them. Im mostly just saying our conversations were personal because i dont really want to tell people what he really thought of them. I know they are a little upset, i gave his watch to his grandson but thats what he asked me to do. Ive pretty much alienated myself from their grief because it just seems fake and overdramatic.
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I'd say a lifetime but the idea of mourning changes in that lifetime. At first it's like a knife is stabbing you over and over again and you can't function. You can feel like you're drowning and barely treading water (I am grieving my mom after only a month of passing but have lost friends including my best friend about 10 years ago and a grandparent that was close to me). I think you just get used to the feeling so that it isn't so debilitating after a while. You learn what to expect and how to avoid the sharp pains and instead only feel the dull ones. You learn a memory will cause you to feel as though you can't breath and so that one is one you don't think about it. Grieving is personal. Some people are able to handle death and not look back and are just fine with the process. Others get stuck and can't move forward. Some need counseling, others are able to handle it themselves. Some can talk about the person right away, others can't even hear their name without breaking down and sobbing. It's so very personal but in most cases as long as you are willing, you will move through stages and it will get a bit easier. You will always miss the person, always think of them and the memories won't disappear but instead they will become a part of you much as that vacation you took as a child is a part of you, their memories of how they cooked with you, or you talked with them about certain topics will. You aren't alone. Remember that and give yourself a break. (I'm saying this to myself as much as to you since i have to constantly keep reminding myself it's ok to cry and feel sorry for myself and miss my mom so badly because I'm grieving).

My personally for 3 weeks I didnt' cry. I was with my mom when she passed away. She passed away from cancer and it was eating her from the inside out literally. I watched her suffer in pain, and watched her journey. It wasn't a long one but it was painful so when she passed, I felt at peace. It didn't stop me from grieving just took me longer to miss her as I had to get past the idea that she was no longer suffering but instead to me actually missing her in my life. My dad on the other hand cried for weeks and still does almost every day. He hears her name and cries. He thinks of her and cries. Someone mentions something about her and he cries. He tells someone she died and he cries. My sister on the other hand who lives far away doesn't cry. She instead is just angry and yells and screams all the time cuz she isn't releasing her pain. Everyone is different. You might find in a few weeks you start the grieving process or you might find you are ok with watching her pass so much that you don't find yourself grieving knowing she is in a place with no more pain.
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25 years.
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I think everyone is different. I didn't morn at all when my dad passed. I was just relieved for him. He had a very difficult last few years.
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It varies with each person. Caregivers are often able to recover because they witnessed all the suffering and are relieved the loved one has been set free. Distant family struggles with guilt for not being there sooner. Worst of all are co-dependent children, because they never controlled themselves and can feel totally adrift for months.
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