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My dad has COPD and docs have said that we need to get all paperwork in order because if he ends up in hospital no telling what may happen. His lung function is at 45% and his oxygen saturation/diffusion is at 25% with chronic kidney disease at 45%. The doctor said that he has the body of a 94 year old and in the past few years I have watched him dwindle in strength. He barely walks anywhere, always riding the "ol fart carts" at the stores, he doesn't walk more than 20 feet without getting winded and his muscles are so atrophied that just to lift his foot up for me to put lotion on is a chore. He sits hunched over and I'm always telling him to sit straight as it opens the lungs up better but he has the habit of sitting that way and I cant change it.
I don't know if anyone else has dealt with COPD issues, (I'm sure a lot of you have). I understand that Hospice comes in when a patient has 6 months or less to live and wonder if this is what we should do. I have talked with dad about his health and tried to be as gentle as I can when explaining how severe his condition is. I am not afraid of death and understand that it is a normal step in life as we are not immortal but to have to explain it to someone who is so close is sometimes difficult.
I am ready and compassionate enough to know his time is limited, but I want him to have it easy without any pain or suffering and just go sweetly and quietly to his next adventure.
Any help with what I should do now? I have sisters however they live out of state and really haven't been around him for 30 years like I have so I am pretty much on my own here even though I do let them know how he is doing.

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I have a friend whose dad came to stay with her that has copd. She signed the form to be caregiver but cant handle him now.he is aggressive.no other family member will take him in and he doesn't want to go to nursing home.what can she do to get him out of her home.
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I agree, Pam. In fact, good possibility her blood pressure and sugar levels are much better now that she only weighs 100 pounds. Last checks were in the normal zone. So hoping to see a bit of improvement in her health as well as appetite.
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So Cal, you may see a dramatic improvement with the reduction in medication. That's not a miracle, but a temporary improvement, a reprieve from the effects of poly pharmacy.
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My mom was just put on hospice this week. She has NPH as her primary diagnosis.Her doctor said less than a year was her criteria, so put in for the evaluation and she passed the eval. I think her biggest factor that got her in was she has lost 30 pounds in the last year, 10 in two months, and is right at or dipping under 100 pounds, along with breaking her ankle two months ago. She is in a residential care home. Hospice took her off all diabetic meds, all but one blood pressure, and left her on emotional meds for depression and anxiety, and also provided a hospital bed right away. Her meds were a meal in themselves. They plan to send a nurse in twice a week on top of the regular care she receives in the home. Her trips to the doctor's office were very difficult with my brother having to lift her into his truck, and then after waiting 45 minutes the doctor spent 10 minutes for her and sent her on her way with virtually no care provided. We and her caretakers believe she will get much more personalized medical care this way, and her biggest fear was always a hospital, and this hopefully will take that need away. They said they have to reevaluate her every 90 days to keep her in the program. It is fully covered by Medicare.
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Actually, Hospice is ordered by the MD, so call his MD, and ask if it is time for Hospice to do an evaluation. At first, the help comes once a month, then once a week, then more often as needed. If dad can still get out and go to stores, it is probably not time yet. Still, you need to put papers in order, find the Will, do a POA, get a Health Care Proxy, etc.
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im an idiot but i read. a copd patient does better with the pressurized air flow froma window fan than all the oxygen therapy in the world.. if you opt for o2 make sure the nosepiece lies loosely in the nostrils because the o2 flow alone is not enough to supply the air intake needs of the patient. point the nosepiece downwards so the o2 flow doesnt dry out the upper sinuses. i know nurses who dont get this concept and sadly never will. the o2 flow will not fill the lungs. if you dont believe me try taking all your lung input thru a 1/4 inch drinking straw. youll run a deficit of lung flow in 30 seconds. the o2 is an enrichment , not an adequate lung supply..
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