How long are you in the hospital with c. diff.?

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RuizGirl63 I am not sure what you know about c-diff. It is an overgrowth of one of the bacteria that naturally lives in our colon. It usually occurs when, due to antibiotics or another type of medication or a compromised immune system the balance of bacteria becomes disrupted and c-diff is the end result.
You should also be aware of what many physicians do not share with families. C-Diff is highly contagious in hospitals and long term care facilities because patients in those types of places have weakened/compromised immune systems and/or are being administered medications that can contribute to their susceptibility to c-diff, especially high dose, multiple or broad spectrum antibiotics. This means that any family member that may want to visit and help out would be at potential risk if he or she was being treated or had been treated as above in the recent past. The bacteria travels by spore so even with the best hand washing and cleaning practices, even isolation, there is still a risk of exposure and therefor, contamination.
I speak from experience. As explained to me by the best gastroenterologist in New York over 25 years ago when I was working as an RN in Memorial Sloane Kettering Cancer Center and found myself sitting in his office being told that I had c-diff less than 24 hours after I had treated two patients with end-stage Kaposi's sarcoma in isolation with it, the bacteria travels by spore. Even if I used perfect sterile procedure, while I was removing my gown and gloves a spore may have dislodged (he said jumped) from my gown or gloves to my uniform sleeve. Then when I was having lunch I may have scratched my arm and, because it is transmitted via a fecal-oral route, there I was. Without my knowledge I inadvertently put fecal bacteria spores into my mouth as I ate my lunch or scratched my lip or some other benign thing I likely do 100 times each day without realising I am putting my hands near my mouth. I have had numerous episodes of c-diff every year since I was first infected.
The bacteria spores can live on dry surfaces for a long time so can be picked up and carried to other places and people if hands and surfaces are not kept meticulously clean. You and your family should do all you can to keep yourselves healthy while supporting your Mum through this. Never rely solely on hand sanitizer when visiting. Always be sure to wash with soap and water before and after every interaction with your Mum or dealing with anything in her room.
Make sure to encourage your Mum to drink any and all fluids that her doctors allow as dehydration can be an issue depending on how much fluid loss there is with the diarrhoea from the c-diff. Fluids are especially important for her as she is having kidney issues as well. Due to any pain she may be experiencing she may not have much of an appetite. If the doctor agrees, try to get her to have some soup but only if you or someone you know can make it as I cannot imagine her kidney could handle the amount of sodium in canned soups. The great thing about soup as a meal for her is that she is getting nutrition and calories for energy but also getting in more fluids and lots of veggies if she struggles to eat vegetables. Nutrition is important during her recovery from c-diff as the diarrhoea takes so much energy out of the body. It is nothing like a typical stomach bug in that regard. Her recovery may be long and slow and much more than her digestion may be altered by this.
I wish you peace as you walk through the days and weeks to come. Take very gentle loving care of yourself. Do not hesitate to come back here for anything you may need. Also be sure to ask questions of the doctors and staff who are treating and caring for your Mum. This will not be their first encounter with c-diff and they should be able to answer any questions you may have, especially how they apply to your Mum with her individual health care needs and her unique situation.
With peace, gratitude and grace XO
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Thank you
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NYDIL is correct here- we're not doctors, and can only give you an idea of what we've experienced ourselves as caregivers. C.Diff is a tricky little bug to deal with, difficult to get rid of once it sets in, and is spread very, very easily in facilities like hospitals and nursing homes.

Your mother's additional health issues are definitely going to play a role here, but only her doctors can tell you for certain what the prognosis is.
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So she went into hospital today. Ask her doctor's their prognosis.
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My mother is in the hospital as of 4/25/17.
She also has pneumonia, and has kidney disease.
She is 72, and retired in February from a fulltime employment as a Deli Clerk at a store.
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C. difficile is usually gotten in the hospital. It is difficult to treat especially if the person is already frail. Can the person be discharged from the hospital and supported at home to recover?
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This is a pretty vague and open question as the answer can vary greatly based on the health of the patient, the degree of illness, the medications the patient is on and a variety of other factors. Are there any other details you can give so we might be better able to inform you? No matter what, c-diff can be tricky to treat and can reoccur for years after the original infection. Than-q!
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